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I am packaging my Mono GTK# application for Ubuntu/Debian (.deb).

  • How do I find out which dependencies to list in the control file?
  • Which are the standard ones, for mono and gtk# themselves? Is it the ones ending in -dev?

I have looked in the Debian packaging docs, but those examples seem overly complicated with post-installation hooks etc.

The examples in the mono documentation mostly concern source distributions with automake etc. I just want to put binaries in there.

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2 Answers 2

I have just gone through the process of packaging my GTK# mono application (Wide Margin) for debian.

Here is my control file:

Source: widemargin
Section: gnome
Priority: extra
Maintainer: Debian CLI Applications Team <pkg-cli-apps-team@lists.alioth.debian.org>
Uploaders: Daniel Hughes <trampster@gmail.com>
Build-Depends: debhelper (>= 7.0.50~), cli-common-dev (>= 0.7.1), mono-xbuild (>= 2.6.7), libgtk2.0-cil-dev (>= 2.12.10), mono-devel (>= 2.6.7), libglade2.0-cil-dev (>= 2.12.10)
Standards-Version: 3.9.2
Homepage: https://bitbucket.org/trampster/widemargin
Vcs-Git: git://git.debian.org/git/pkg-cli-apps/packages/widemargin.git
Vcs-Browser: http://git.debian.org/?p=pkg-cli-apps/packages/widemargin.git

Package: widemargin
Architecture: all
Depends: ${cli:Depends}, ${misc:Depends}
Description: bible reading and study application
 Wide Margin is a bible reading and study application. It has a focus on
 speed and simplicity. Features include, as you type searching and passage
 navigation, familiar browser based interface, full navigation history and 
 a built in reading planner which will have you read the old testament 
 once and the new testament twice every year.

The important thing to note here is that if you use ${cli:Depends}, ${misc:Depends} in your Depends section the dependencies will be auto-magically sorted out for you. You will however have to set your Build-Depends manually.

The second tip is to get onto the #debian-cli irc channel, it contains all the mono packagers for debain. They are super helpful and will sponsor you package for you when it is ready.

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Thanks for the info. Why do you include xbuild into Build-Depends? Does this package contain source code? And does the ${cli:Depends}, ${misc:Depends} trick also work with pre-compiled binaries? –  Jasper van den Bosch Oct 28 '11 at 9:21
    
Xbuild is mono's version of msbuild. It's what I use to build my binaries. And yes my package is built from source (if you want it in debain it needs to be that way). I don't know the answer to your last question I would jump onto the @debian-cli irc channel and ask there. –  trampster Oct 28 '11 at 10:57
    
Ok, so as i mentioned I want to package binaries. It is not meant to be a package for the Debian repositories, I will distribute myself. But thanks for your tip I will ask around there, perhaps I can return a favor. –  Jasper van den Bosch Oct 28 '11 at 12:58
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Have a look at this tutorial:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/PackagingGuide/Mono

I haven't yet tried it myself but it seems concise so far.

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Thanks for your answer, but as I said I looked at these docs. On dependencies, the one you links says: "This guide assumes that you know what mono libraries are required to build the package. In this example, you need libgtk2.0-cil-dev, libvte0.16-cil-dev, libwebkit-cil-dev . So you add them to the build-depends line in the control file." So how do I know whether these also apply to my application? –  Jasper van den Bosch Oct 21 '11 at 12:55
1  
If your application compiles, you already have all the info you need. E.g. if your command line compile or monodevelop solution includes gkeyfile-sharp you could issue a dpkg -S gkeyfile-sharp.dll to get the name of the runtime package and a dpkg -S gkeyfile-sharp.pc to get the development package. –  aquaherd Oct 23 '11 at 10:12
    
And would I distribute the development package or the runtime package? –  Jasper van den Bosch Oct 28 '11 at 9:22
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