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I'm writing a program C and tracking my source with git.

Every time I run my makefile I need to commit my build. (Yes, I know this isn't an ideal thing to do or 'smart' idea but I have to do this for school.)

How would I commit myprogram to my git repo with the comment of date from my make file? Should I use a shell script instead?

Here is my Makefile below

BUILDID=$(shell date +%Y%m%d-%H:%M:%S)
CFLAGS=-Wall -g

all: myprogram

clean:
    rm -f *.o
    rm -f myprogram
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are lots of ways in which doing this doesn't make sense, as you acknowledge in your question. However, assuming that what you want is to make your git repository reflect all the changes in your working tree (apart from ignored files), you could do the following:

.PHONY: all commit

BUILDID=$(shell date +%Y%m%d-%H:%M:%S)
CFLAGS=-Wall -g

all: myprogram commit

commit:
    git add -A .
    git commit -m 'Automatic commit of successful build $(BUILDID)'

clean:
    rm -f *.o
    rm -f myprogram

(The .PHONY is GNU make specific, meaning that its dependencies aren't real targets.)

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Thank you Mark, it's for a school project and I don't understand why I'm tracking the buildfiles if I'm tracking the code but there's a reason to the madness. –  gaelanadams Oct 19 '11 at 21:59

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