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  <script type="text/javascript">
        $(function () {
            $("#slider-range").slider({
                range: true,
                min: 0,
                max: 100,
                values: [25, 75],
                slide: function (event, ui) {
                    $("#minval").val("" + ui.values[0] + " - " + ui.values[1]);
                }
            });
            $("#minval").val("" + $("#slider-range").slider("values", 0) +
            " - " + $("#slider-range").slider("values", 1));
        });
    </script>
    <script type="text/javascript">

        $(function () {


            $('.datePicker').datetimepicker({ dateFormat: 'dd/mm/yy' });

        });
    </script>

I managed to do one script on page load with this code

function pageLoad(sender, args) {         $('.datePicker').datetimepicker({ dateFormat: 'dd/mm/yy' });     } 

how can I run both the java script on page load, I am using this in asp.net website

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by FishBasketGordo, tvanfosson, jfriend00, animuson, Graviton Oct 20 '11 at 2:10

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
What's your question? – James Hill Oct 19 '11 at 16:15
    
I think it's yes. – Blender Oct 19 '11 at 16:16
    
I want to load the function on page load like this, but I dont know how to do.. function pageLoad(sender, args) – Mano Oct 19 '11 at 16:17
2  
What is your question? $(document).ready(function() {/* put your code here */}) is the standard jQuery way of running code when the page is loaded. $(function() {}) that you are using will also accomplish the same thing (though a lot less readable IMO). – jfriend00 Oct 19 '11 at 16:17
    
Please provide a detailed question in the content of your question rather than a only general question in the title of your question. – Korvin Szanto Oct 19 '11 at 16:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

put the function you want to run in the onload event of your <body> tag is one way

<script type="text/javascript">
  function loadFunc(){
  //....
  }
</script>

<body onload="loadFunc()">
share|improve this answer
1  
This is not required. The OP is already using a jQuery technique for waiting until the DOM is ready with $(function() {/* code here */}). – jfriend00 Oct 19 '11 at 16:37
    
@jfriend00 & downvoter - I said that its one way to do it. And apparently it helped him and answered his question..which wasn't tagged jQuery to begin with – Nick Rolando Oct 20 '11 at 16:22

This is a very poorly asked question...

I'm inferring by your example that you are using jQuery and by your title that you are trying to get something to execute when the DOM is loaded.

to do so you use:

$(document).ready(function(){
    //all code here will execute when the DOM is fully loaded
  });

This will allow you to stack multiple execution blocks which will all be processed when the ready event fires.

If you use:

<html>
  <body onload="func();">
  </body>
</html>

and then try and also add anything to the load event through javascript you will break the page.

Actually reading the documentation, what you did in your example is valid shorthand for .ready(), so it should be working unless you are trying to access things that load after the DOM is ready like images or video

If the code you are trying to execute will be accessing properties of things like images you are better off using .load() since it waits until those are loaded as well. .ready() executes when the DOM is fully loaded but assets have not necessarily been fully recieved

If you have multiple functions to process and one fails in the chain the rest will not process. you can protect against this by putting each in a try{}catch(){} block

share|improve this answer

You have two on page load functions, combine them like so:

$(function() {
    $("#slider-range").slider({
        range: true,
        min: 0,
        max: 100,
        values: [25, 75],
        slide: function(event, ui) {
            $("#minval").val("" + ui.values[0] + " - " + ui.values[1]);
        }
    });
    $("#minval").val("" + $("#slider-range").slider("values", 0) + " - " + $("#slider-range").slider("values", 1));
    $('.datePicker').datetimepicker({
        dateFormat: 'dd/mm/yy'
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Why does this do anything different than the original code? – jfriend00 Oct 19 '11 at 16:18
    
This is more efficient than the original code (in obvious ways) and accomplishes something important: The OP will be able to deduce the meaning of the code that he's been copy/pasting on his own, rather than me just blurting out what it does. This is a much better way to learn, especially when you're asking questions like he did, trying to get things done as fast as possible. He's not trying to learn, he's trying to get the answer. My answer forces him to figure it out himself while solving his problem. – Korvin Szanto Oct 19 '11 at 16:24
1  
I still don't understand how your suggestion generates any different result in execution. Do you even know what question is being asked? I don't. FYI, if code readability is a goal, $(document).ready(function() {}) is way more readable than $(function() {}). – jfriend00 Oct 19 '11 at 16:36

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