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I have a problem with these two classes:

Creature:

public abstract class Creature extends Texturable
{
    public Creature(String ID)
    {
        this.ID = ID;
    } // end Creature()

    protected void setMaximumHealthPoints(int maximumHealthPoints)
    {
        this.maximumHealthPoints = maximumHealthPoints;
    } // end setMaximumHealthPoints()

    protected void setMaximumSpeed(int maximumSpeed)
    {
        this.maximumSpeed = maximumSpeed;
    } // end setMaximumSpeed()

    ...

    protected String ID;
    protected int maximumHealthPoints;
    protected int maximumSpeed;
    ...
} // end Creature

Human:

public class Human extends Creature
{
    public Human(String ID)
    {
        this.ID = ID;
        setMaximumHealthPoints(100);
        setMaximumSpeed(4);
    } // end Human()
} // end Human

What I want to do, is, as the above code says, set maximum health points to 100 and maximum speed to 4 but only for human creatures. :)

When I try to compile it I get the following error: constructor Creature in class Creature cannot be applied to given types. Arguments in Human and Creature constructors are identical. So, what's the problem?

I also tried this:

Human:

public class Human extends Creature
{
    protected int maximumHealthPoints = 100;
    protected int maximumSpeed = 4;
} // end Human

But with no success.

Now I get this error: "Field hides another field".

Is there anything I could do to make it work correctly?

Thanks in advance,

Lucas

share|improve this question
1  
try calling super(ID) in human, you have no default constructor for creature only one that takes a param, or you can just add a default constructor, public Creature(){} – Brian Colvin Oct 19 '11 at 16:47
    
You'll want to follow Java naming conventions and make ID lower case id. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 19 '11 at 16:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is nothing to do with the maximum speed or health points bits - it's the constructor. Your Creature class only has one constructor, which takes a String. You're not specifying how to chain the the superclass constructor from Human, so the compiler is looking for an accessible parameterless constructor. A constructor always has to chain to either the superclass constructor or another constructor in the same class. If you don't specify anything to chain to with super(...) or this(...) then that's equivalent to:

super();

... which isn't valid in this case, as there's no such constructor to chain to.

You want:

// You should consider renaming ID to id, by the way...
public Human(String ID)
{
    super(ID);
    // Other stuff (but don't bother setting the ID field -
    // it's already been set by the Creature constructor)
}

I would also strongly advise you to make your fields private, and only access them from getter/setter methods declared in Creature.

Note that contrary to your title, there's no overriding going on here at all. Constructors aren't overridden - only methods are. Each class has its own set of constructor signatures; they aren't inherited at all - they just let you chain from the subclass to the superclass.

share|improve this answer

Change the Human constructor to call the correct base class constructor like so:

public Human(String ID)
{
    super(ID);
    setMaximumHealthPoints(100);
    setMaximumSpeed(4);
}

Your code as it stands implicitly tries to call the parameterless constructor of Creature, which doesn't exist.

share|improve this answer

it is compulsory to call the parent class's arguments constructor either implictely when you define a default non argument constructor , or explicitely when you define your custom constructor with arguments , as the suggested solutions show .

share|improve this answer
    
Or to call another constructor in the same class, of course... – Jon Skeet Oct 19 '11 at 16:59
    
yep as long as the super constructor is called at the end – Genjuro Oct 19 '11 at 17:01

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