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I am wondering if there are high speed min and max function that works on columns similarly to colMeans?

For 'max', although I can simulate the behavior with 'apply' such as the following:

colMax <- function (colData) {
    apply(colData, MARGIN=c(2), max)
}

It seems a lot slower than the colMeans in the base package.

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In S-Plus, there are colMaxs, colMedians and a bunch of other similar functions. Unfortunately R didn't implement all of them. –  Tommy Oct 19 '11 at 18:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

pmax is ~ 10x faster than apply. Still not as fast as colMeans though.

data = matrix(rnorm(10^6), 100)
data.df = data.frame(t(data))

system.time(apply(data, MARGIN=c(2), max))
system.time(do.call(pmax, data.df))
system.time(colMeans(data))
> system.time(apply(data, MARGIN=c(2), max))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.133   0.006   0.139 
> system.time(do.call(pmax, data.df))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.013   0.000   0.013 
> system.time(colMeans(data))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.003   0.000   0.002
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Another option for matrix X is sapply(seq_len(ncol(X)), function(x) max(X[, x])). –  jbaums Aug 17 '12 at 3:38

One can always start with profiling, but your hunch seems correct:

R> colMax <- function(X) apply(X, 2, max)
R> library(rbenchmark)
R> Z <- matrix(rnorm(100*100), 100, 100)
R> benchmark(colMeans(Z), colMax(Z))
         test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child 
2   colMax(Z)          100   0.350     87.5      0.12        0          0 
1 colMeans(Z)          100   0.004      1.0      0.00        0          0 
R>

In that case you may want to consider writing a simple C/C++ function using inline with the basic C API for R, or our Rcpp package. That should get your colMeans-alike speed.

Edit: Here is a more complete example. colMeans still wins, but we're getting closer:

R> suppressMessages(library(inline))
R> suppressMessages(library(rbenchmark))
R>
R> colMaxR <- function(X) apply(X, 2, max)
R>
R> colMaxRcpp <- cxxfunction(signature(X_="numeric"), plugin="Rcpp",
+                           body='
+   Rcpp::NumericMatrix X(X_);
+   int n = X.ncol();
+   Rcpp::NumericVector V(n);
+   for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
+      Rcpp::NumericVector W = X.column(i);
+      V[i] = *std::max_element(W.begin(), W.end());  // from the STL
+   }
+   return(V);
+ ')
R>
R>
R> Z <- matrix(rnorm(100*100), 100, 100)
R> benchmark(colMeans(Z), colMaxR(Z), colMaxRcpp(Z), replications=1000, order="relative")
           test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child 
1   colMeans(Z)         1000   0.036  1.00000      0.04        0          0 
3 colMaxRcpp(Z)         1000   0.050  1.38889      0.05        0          0 
2    colMaxR(Z)         1000   1.002 27.83333      1.01        0          0 
R>
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Now make it run on multiple cores and you'll (probably) win ... –  Ben Bolker Oct 19 '11 at 19:34
    
PS I take it back. I've spent a few minutes dinking around with the new parallel package and it seems that the overhead is just too large unless you're cleverer than I am ... –  Ben Bolker Oct 19 '11 at 19:47

pmin and pmax can be used easily to get row mins and maxes, but its a bit awkward for columns.

# row maxes
do.call("pmax",mtcars)
 [1] 160.0 160.0 108.0 258.0 360.0 225.0 360.0 146.7 140.8 167.6 167.6 275.8
[13] 275.8 275.8 472.0 460.0 440.0  78.7  75.7  71.1 120.1 318.0 304.0 350.0
[25] 400.0  79.0 120.3 113.0 351.0 175.0 335.0 121.0

# col maxes
do.call("pmax",data.frame(t(mtcars)))
 [1]  33.900   8.000 472.000 335.000   4.930   5.424  22.900   1.000   1.000
[10]   5.000   8.000

Another option is max.col, which also (confusingly) gives row maxes by default.

mmtcars <- as.matrix(mtcars)
mmtcars[max.col(t(mmtcars))+(seq(dim(mmtcars)[2])-1)*dim(mmtcars)[1]]
 [1]  33.900   8.000 472.000 335.000   4.930   5.424  22.900   1.000   1.000
[10]   5.000   8.000
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1  
Since mtcars is a data.frame, you could use sapply(mtcars, max). –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 19 '11 at 17:09

The matrixStats package has a lot of great functions, including colMaxs.

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