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I have this code :

public void GenerateWtW() {
        ExecutorService exec = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(30);

        ConcurrentHashMap<String, Double> tf_idfCache = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, Double>();
        ArrayList<String> allwords = getAllWords();
        int no_docs = getNumberOfDocs();

        int cnt = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < allwords.size(); i++) {
            String word1 = allwords.get(i);
            if (i < allwords.size() - 1) {
                for (int j = i + 1; j < allwords.size(); j++) {
                    String word2 = allwords.get(j);
                    cnt++;
                    if (word1.equals(word2)) {
                        continue;
                    }

                    //System.out.println("[" + cnt + "] WtW Started: " + word1 + "," + word2 + " No of Docs: " + no_docs + " Total No of words: " + allwords.size());
                    WTWThread t = new WTWThread(tf_idfCache, word1, word2, this, no_docs, db);
                    exec.execute(t);

                }
            }
        }
        exec.shutdown();
    }

and here is the code for the thread:

private static class WTWThread implements Runnable {

        private ConcurrentHashMap<String, Double> cacheRef;
        private String word1, word2;
        private WordRank workRankInstance;
        private int no_docs;
        private Database db;

        public WTWThread(ConcurrentHashMap<String, Double> cacheRef, String word1, String word2, WordRank workRankInstance, int no_docs, Database db) {
            this.cacheRef = cacheRef;
            this.word1 = word1;
            this.word2 = word2;
            this.workRankInstance = workRankInstance;
            this.no_docs = no_docs;
            this.db = db;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            double sum = 0;

            for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
                Double tf_idf1 = cacheRef.get(word1 + i);
                if (tf_idf1 == null) {
                    tf_idf1 = workRankInstance.getTF_IDF(word1, i);
                    cacheRef.put(word1 + i, tf_idf1);
                }
                Double tf_idf2 = cacheRef.get(word2 + i);
                if (tf_idf2 == null) {
                    tf_idf2 = workRankInstance.getTF_IDF(word2, i);
                    cacheRef.put(word2 + i, tf_idf2);
                }
                sum = sum + (tf_idf1 * tf_idf2);
            }
            double wtw = sum / no_docs;
            String query = "INSERT INTO wtw(word1,word2,wtw) VALUES(?,?,?);";
            try {
                PreparedStatement ps = db.getConnection().prepareStatement(query);
                ps.setString(1, word1);
                ps.setString(2, word2);
                ps.setDouble(3, wtw);
                ps.executeUpdate();
                ps.close();
            } catch (SQLException ex) {
                Logger.getLogger(WordRank.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
        }
    }

everything to me looks fine but here is what happens, when I run the program it processes the first few hundreds and then suddenly stops ! I checked in the System Monitor, the java process starts growing in memory usage and it goes up to something about 1Gb and then nothing happens. I thought maybe this is happening because I'm having too many threads, I tried with 4 threads but same thing happens. Then I thought maybe I should use sleep() before creating the threads and that did solve the problem, it worked like a charm, but even sleep(1) makes the program very slow ! and I checked every possible thing that I could think of ! Is there anything I'm missing here ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

How many words do you have, how much RAM do you have and what is this program doing?

Your tf_idfCache will get very large growing at least quadratically with number of words, with quite of constant factor (you are putting 10 things to cache for every word?), and it might cause performance problems.

Finally you do have a concurrency issue, but I don't think it is causing a lock. In code

Double tf_idf1 = cacheRef.get(word1 + i);
if (tf_idf1 == null) {
    tf_idf1 = workRankInstance.getTF_IDF(word1, i);
    cacheRef.put(word1 + i, tf_idf1);
}

You have no guarantee that you won't calculate rank twice.

I don't think that number of threads is causing any problem, but you might have some other concurrency issue that is causing a lock (if locking, and not memory overhead is a problem at all).

share|improve this answer
    
It's not a matter of heap space problem, i assigned 2gb to the heap. the problem is that threads are growing so fast and i think jvm can't handle it ! cause as i said, then i put a delay before it, everything works fine ! there is no memory leak and there is no lock situation. I think there is something i need to do about the thread pool –  Tohid Oct 20 '11 at 15:07
    
You are not making threads, you are making Runnable objects, that should be distributed among fixed number of threads (30 in your example). They are probably garbage collected soon after they finish their job. –  Slartibartfast Oct 20 '11 at 17:20

Sounds like you're either having an OutOfMemoryError, or the program didn't actually stop but is grinding to a near-halt by disk swapping due to the memory usage. 1 GiB is quite a lot. Find out if you have memory leaks, maybe with a profiler. Any recent JDK comes bundled with JVisualVM.

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as i said if i put sleep() before the thread call it works fine ! I may have some performance issues but I don't think there is any leak problem. –  Tohid Oct 19 '11 at 17:41

Your code never removes entries from cacheRef and it looks like every thread will up to 20 new elements to it. In your main thread's body, it loops using the current size and not the initial size. I don't see how the program will end if new entries are continually added. This is because I do not know the nature of your data or the rest of the program. If your program is removing entries then at some other point, try wrapping the inner body of the for loop in a synchronized block as follows (assuming getTF_IDF does not need cacheRef):

for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
    synchronized(cacheRef) {
        Double tf_idf1 = cacheRef.get(word1 + i);
        if (tf_idf1 == null) {
            tf_idf1 = workRankInstance.getTF_IDF(word1, i);
            cacheRef.put(word1 + i, tf_idf1);
        }
        Double tf_idf2 = cacheRef.get(word2 + i);
        if (tf_idf2 == null) {
            tf_idf2 = workRankInstance.getTF_IDF(word2, i);
            cacheRef.put(word2 + i, tf_idf2);
        }
    }
    sum = sum + (tf_idf1 * tf_idf2);
}

This may fix/help you find your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
it's a ConcurrentHashMap, so as far as i know that shouldn't happen :) –  Tohid Oct 20 '11 at 15:04
2  
@Tohid You are wrong about how ConcurrentHasMap works. It guarantees that when you are putting (or removing) things at the same time from multiple threads, it will be OK. But there are no guarantees about what will happen between two method calls. –  Slartibartfast Oct 20 '11 at 17:19
    
ConcurrentHashMap only guarantees operations dealing with the map's underlying data are thread safe (prevents two threads from being in the hash map's put method at the same time). However, ConcurrentHashMap does not guarantee the threads will properly coordinate the timing of these operations with each other. This is the programmer's job. The synchronized block prevents a race condition from happening in the time between the two calls to cacheRef's put methods. –  jcbelanger Oct 22 '11 at 18:33

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