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In my humble little regression script, I have a set of objects. At the top is a hash, containing a handful of simple data and an instance of my first class: Items.

Items contains data taken from a webtable, represented by an array. Each element in the array corresponds to a row.

Each row is represented by a hash of my other class: Item. The hash key is the column name, and the Item object stores the column name, cell data, and tooltip.

In both Item and Items I have overridden the == operator

I first tried to take advantage of the intelligence hinted at by the documentation of Hash (from ruby-doc.org):

Equality—Two hashes are equal if they each contain the same number of keys and if each key-value pair is equal to (according to Object#==) the corresponding elements in the other hash.

I assumed that would iterate through the elements in my hash, and would use my overridden operator when it came to the Items class objects. No luck. The comparison returned either true or false, but my operator was never triggered.

I tried adding a wrapper around top level hash and provided a few operator overrides, including the == operator. Still no luck. When it reached the Items objects it did not trigger the override.

So, do operator overrides not work beyond the highest level?

Here are the bits of my code I've been using to debug:

class Item
  def initialize(col, data, tooltip = nil)
    @col = col
    @data = data
    @tooltip = tooltip
  end

  def ==(obj)
    # This should be called, in turn, by Items, but never is.
    puts "Item Comparison"
    ret = data == obj.data and col == obj.col and tooltip == obj.tooltip
  end
end

class Items
  def initialize(file, items = nil)
    @file = file
    items.nil? ? @items = Array.new : @items = items
  end

  def ==(obj)
    # This should be called for my Items objects, but never is
    puts "Items comparison"

    0.upto(items.length - 1) {
      |i|
      the_same = true
      self.items[i].each do
        |key, val|
        the_same &= (self.items[i][key] == obj.items[i][key])
      end
    }
  end
end

class ResultsWrapper
  def initialize
    # These contain a few strings and an Items object
    @hash = Hash.new
  end

  def ==(obj)
    self.hash.each do
    |key, val|
    # This is where I expected my operator for Items be used
    # when my Items objects are reached. Yes, they will
    # have the same key. I checked that too.
    val == obj.hash[key]
  end
end
end

I've verified that the objects being compared are indeed my class but my operators still aren't firing. However, if I change Items to use compare(obj) instead of ==(obj), my method is called. Which is what I've done to complete my project. :) But I would still like to know why it's not working using operators.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry to be so lazy, but although it looks like you've put some effort into working this out, the code example you've provided could be improved a bit. Does Item need to have three different instance variables in order to demonstrate the issue? And could you supply some code that uses the classes and methods provided in your question? –  Andrew Grimm Oct 19 '11 at 23:02
    
No, it doesn't need the variables. I just didn't think to take them out. And to your second question, I can but currently the method is tied into a data collection routine written for a specific page. So I'll have to edit it first. –  TheMarmosetKing Oct 21 '11 at 15:17

1 Answer 1

The issue is not that Ruby does not accept comparison override cascades (it does so just fine), it is one of object identity. If you initialize your objects like this:

first_item  = Item.new(1, "Some Data")
second_item = Item.new(2, "Moar data")

first_itms  = Items.new([first_item, second_item])
second_itms = Items.new([first_item, second_item])

some = ResultsWrapper.new
some.hash[:string] = "Test String"
some.hash[:items]  = first_itms
moar = ResultsWrapper.new
moar.hash[:string] = "Test String"
moar.hash[:items]  = second_itms

the values inside first_itms.item and second_itms.items will each point to the same two objects, and comparison will always return true without having to call the Item class == method (an object is always equal to itself).

If instead you do this:

first_item  = Item.new(1, "Some Data")
second_item = Item.new(2, "Moar data")
third_item  = Item.new(1, "Some Data")
fourth_item = Item.new(2, "Moar data")

first_itms  = Items.new([first_item, second_item])
second_itms = Items.new([third_item, fourth_item])

some = ResultsWrapper.new
some.hash[:string] = "Test String"
some.hash[:items]  = first_itms
moar = ResultsWrapper.new
moar.hash[:string] = "Test String"
moar.hash[:items]  = second_itms

two different Item objects will be created, albeit with identical values, and the overridden comparison operator will be called.

Two related notes: One, you can greatly simplify your comparison methods to:

class Items
  def ==(obj)
    self.items == obj.items
  end
end

class ResultsWrapper
  def ==(obj)
    self.hash == obj.hash
  end
end

as you do in fact compare inbuilt object types (a Hashand an Array). Two, you might also want to add alias eql? == to your three classes for more consistency.

share|improve this answer
    
My first object was being built from XML data, and the other was being built from data in the application being tested. Also, they were built in different methods and compared later. Even then, my operators weren't being called. To refer back to the first comments by Andrew Grimm, I'll have to monkey with the code a little to provide a workable example as the application is internal only. –  TheMarmosetKing Oct 21 '11 at 15:20
    
Oh, and thanks to all for your suggestions so far. :) –  TheMarmosetKing Oct 21 '11 at 15:22
    
Have you tried simplifying your == methods as suggested? Unless some important code chunk is missing in your post, I can’t see how your Items::== method would work as intended – it calls each on the members of the items array, which will only work if they are Enumerable (you are already iterating over the array in your for loop). Could your code possibly die quietly on you because some overly broad resume squashes the resultant error? I know it throws one for me… –  kopischke Oct 21 '11 at 15:42

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