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I have the following class:

abstract class MyAbstract<T>
{
    T val_;
    MyAbstract(T val)
    {
        val_ = val;
    }
    T getVal()
    {
        return val_;
    }
}

I would like my abstract class to have a different body for T = String, for example (bear with me):

abstract class MyAbstract<T extends String>
{
    T val_;
    T upperVal_;
    MyAbstract(T val)
    {
        val_ = val;
        upperVal_ = val.toUpperCase();
    }
    T getVal()
    { 
        return upperVal_; 
    }
}

The result I am trying to achieve is that if I extend MyAbstract, the second version will be used, otherwise the first one. Is this possible, and how? Thanks!

Update: I want to be able to extend the same abstract class and do stuff like:

Type1 extends MyAbstract<Integer>...

and

Type2 extends MyAbstract<String>...

(note that I use MyAbstract for both Types)

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make the second implementation extend the first.

abstract class MyAbstract2<T extends String> extends MyAbstract<T>
{
    T upperVal_;

    MyAbstract(T val)
    {
        super(val);
        upperVal_ = val.toUpperCase();
    }

    @Override
    T getVal()
    { 
        return upperVal_; 
    }
}
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I am trying to achieve this while using the same name, so I can do stuff like Type extends MyAbstract<blah> and Type2 extends MyAbstract<String> (not create a second abstract type). I will update the question to specify this requirement. –  Dan Nestor Oct 19 '11 at 17:49
    
No, you cannot do this. Why do you want to? What bigger problem are you trying to solve? –  Matt Ball Oct 19 '11 at 17:52
    
Oh :( It was more of an academic question. I already have solutions for my problem, I am just trying to make the code more readable (at least according to my idea of readable :) ) –  Dan Nestor Oct 19 '11 at 18:10
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Java does not support template specialization like C++ does. In particular, all instances of a generic class declaration share the same runtime class, and hence have the same set of fields.

Whatever you are trying to accomplish, you'll have to do it differently in Java.

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