Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new here so I hope I will write understandable question.

My problem is, how to access a static array in class by using overloaded operator ().

Main.cpp:

class SomeClass
{
public:
    static const int a[2][2];

    const int& operator() (int x, int y) const;
};

Just under it, I define the array a:

const int SomeClass::a[2][2] = {{ 1, 2 }, { 3, 4 }};

Here is the overloaded operator:

const int& SomeClass::operator() (int x, int y) const
{
    return a[x][y];
}

In main(), I want to access 'a' 2D array just by using SomeClass(1, 1) which shloudl return 4. But when I try to compile main like this:

int main(void)
{
    cout << SomeClass(1, 1) << endl;

    return 0;
}

I get this error:

PretizeniOperatoru.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
PretizeniOperatoru.cpp:22:22: error: no matching function for call to ‘Tabulka::Tabulka(int, int)’
PretizeniOperatoru.cpp:22:22: note: candidates are:
PretizeniOperatoru.cpp:5:7: note: SomeClass::SomeClass()
PretizeniOperatoru.cpp:5:7: note:   candidate expects 0 arguments, 2 provided
PretizeniOperatoru.cpp:5:7: note: SomeClass::SomeClass(const SomeClass&)
PretizeniOperatoru.cpp:5:7: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 2 provided

I realised I don't know, where is the problem. It seems that there is called a constructor of the class. It seems that I'm constructing the class instead of accessing the array.

What does it mean? Is there any way to do the array like this or it would be better to break rules of encapsulation and define it as global? Does it mean, that overloaded operators cannot be used to access static arrays?

When I do it this way, it compiles OK:

int main(void)
{
    SomeClass class;
    cout << class(1, 1) << endl;

    return 0;
}

Thanks for response and hope my problem makes sense. I didn't use [] operator for accessing, because it is more hard to implement than ( ).

share|improve this question
2  
That second snippet doesn't compile. class is a keyword. –  delnan Oct 19 '11 at 17:47
    
@delnan - Oh yes, sorry for this, I have written the first which I have thought of. –  Mimars Oct 19 '11 at 18:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to instantiate an object of your class to access its members. Try using

cout << SomeClass()(1, 1) << endl;

instead, instantiating a temporary and using it's operator().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much, it works. Well, if I understand it now, does it mean, that 'static' keyword indicates the array will be allocated at the beginning of the program? But in this case, creating it again in SomeClass()(1,1) means, that it is allocating again for the purpose of cout and for this moment, it exists twice in the operating memory, yes? –  Mimars Oct 19 '11 at 17:55
    
@Mimars: No. The array is static and is only allocated once, but the operator() is a non-static member function (like all operator overloads) and thus needs an instance to work with. The instance is empty in your case (no data), but still needed. –  thiton Oct 19 '11 at 17:58
    
Wow, cool. I knew why I decided to learn programming... Thank you again for fast responses, your answers are sufficient. –  Mimars Oct 19 '11 at 18:01

You cannot make a static operator(). The syntax SomeClass(1, 1) is trying to call the non-existent constructor for SomeClass which takes two integers. you must have an object instance upon which to call operator(), as you did in the second example (except that class is a keyword).

share|improve this answer

You can't overload operators and make them static.

That being said, you can overload your operator and access the member from an object of the type SomeClass:

SomeClass s;
s(1,2);
share|improve this answer
cout << SomeClass(1, 1) << endl;

This line creates a temporary object of type SomeClass, and passed that object to operator<<.

You want to crate a temporary object, invoke operator(), and pass the result to operator<<:

cout << SomeClass()(1,1) << "\n";

P.s. Never use endl when you mean '\n'.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Just another question - why you recommend not to use endl, but \n? I have read that it is good, because it also flushes output stream. –  Mimars Oct 19 '11 at 18:08
    
@Mimars - It is bad, because it also flushes the output stream, which is comparatively expensive. Many people always use endl for every end-of-line. This makes their programs run v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y when writing large output sets to disk. –  Robᵩ Oct 20 '11 at 3:44

It can be done if you're crafty, but it's ugly. Add a variable to hold the last result, a constructor that sets that variable based on the x and y parameters, and an operator int() to do the conversion. You probably want to overload operator<< as well.

class SomeClass
{
public:
    static const int a[2][2];
    mutable int result;

    SomeClass() {}
    SomeClass(const SomeClass& r) :result(r.result) {}
    SomeClass(int x, int y) :result(a[x][y]) {}
    int operator() (int x, int y) const {return result=a[x][y];}
    operator int() const {return result;}
    friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& o, const SomeClass& r) {return o<<r.result;}
};
const int SomeClass::a[2][2] = {{ 1, 2 }, { 3, 4 }};

http://ideone.com/gQJz5

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for response, I save it to my folder of interesting programming aspects, but for most projects, I will probably use regular SomeClass class; and than work with it as was just explained. –  Mimars Oct 19 '11 at 18:04
    
Yeah, I highly recommend Rob and thiton answers. This one is merely a neat trick. –  Mooing Duck Oct 19 '11 at 18:07
    
+1 I was just about to post the same thing. Great abuse of C++ :). However, DON'T do it unless it's for fun :) –  Luchian Grigore Oct 19 '11 at 18:20

Your const int& SomeClass::operator() (int x, int y) const is not a static operator... the C++ standard doesn't allow it to be declared static either. Therefore, it must be associated with an instance of SomeClass in order to be invoked.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.