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I'm reading C++ Primer and working on its exercise. It want me to get user's input and separate by space ' '. So I come up with 2 solution.

First solution:

vector<string> vector1;
string input;
string temp = ""; // temperary hold each word value in input.

string x1 = "";
char x2 = 'b';

x1 += x2;

cout << x1 << endl;

getline(cin, input);

input += " ";

for (string::size_type index = 0; index != input.size(); index++)
{
    if (!isspace(input[index]))
    {
        temp += input[index];
    }
    else
    {
        if (temp.size() > 0)
        {
            vector1.push_back(temp);
            temp = "";
        }
    }
}

Second solution

vector<string> vector1;
string input;
string temp = ""; // temperary hold each word value in input.

string x1 = "";
char x2 = 'b';

x1 += x2;

cout << x1 << endl;

getline(cin, input);

//input += " ";

for (string::size_type index = 0; index != input.size(); index++)
{
    if (!isspace(input[index]))
    {
        temp += input[index];
    }
    else
    {
        if (temp.size() > 0)
        {
            vector1.push_back(temp);
            temp = "";
        }
    }
}

if (!temp.empty())
{
    vector1.push_back(temp);
}

The difference between them is first solution is add space to user input while second solution check that I don't add last word or not. I want to know which one is better solution for this problem?

If there're better solutions, please tell me.

share|improve this question
1  
You should add some comments to your code that explain what it's doing. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 19 '11 at 17:59
    
Your two solutions are nearly identical ... –  AJG85 Oct 19 '11 at 18:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would write this:

std::vector<std::string> data;

std::copy(std::istream_iterator< std::string>(std::cin), 
          std::istream_iterator< std::string>(),
          std::back_inserter(data));

It is almost same as @K-ballo's answer, except that I let std::copy read directly from input stream (i.e std::cin) rather than from std::stringstream.

Demo: http://www.ideone.com/f0Gtc

--

Or you could make use of vector's constructor, avoiding std::copy altogether:

 std::vector<std::string> data(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(std::cin), 
                               std::istream_iterator<std::string>());

And you're done! Demo : http://www.ideone.com/Szfes

If you find it difficult to read, then use this instead:

 std::istream_iterator<std::string> begin(std::cin), end;
 std::vector<std::string> data(begin, end);

Demo : http://www.ideone.com/PDcud

share|improve this answer
    
I've been doing a lot of programs that read one line at a time lately, and since OP's code also does that, I stayed in that mindset. Your code is (much) faster if he doesn't care about linebreaks. –  Mooing Duck Oct 19 '11 at 18:22
    
@MooingDuck: I just edited it, improving it further. –  Nawaz Oct 19 '11 at 18:22
1  
+1 for sexy factor –  AJG85 Oct 19 '11 at 18:25
1  
I kinda feel bad that we replaced all his work with a one-liner :( –  Mooing Duck Oct 19 '11 at 18:25

In C++, reading space-separated values is quite easy, and is built into the language. I may be wrong, but it looks like you are over-complicating things.

std::string line;
if (std::getline(std::cin, line)) {
    std::stringstream ss(line);
    std::vector<std::string> inputs_on_this_line(
              std::istream_iterator<std::string>(ss)
            , std::istream_iterator<std::string>()    );
    //do stuff with the strings on this line.
}
share|improve this answer
    
aw, but overcomplifying is such an awesome "word." –  Mooing Duck Oct 19 '11 at 18:18
    
It can be further simplified. See my solution. –  Nawaz Oct 19 '11 at 18:19
1  
@OP: If you care about newlines, use this idea. If you want ALL of the input, use Nawaz's version. His is faster. –  Mooing Duck Oct 19 '11 at 18:20

You can easily split the input from a stream into string separated values, and insert them into a vector with:

string input;

... get the input, perhaps with getline(cin, input); ...

stringstream input_stream( input );
vector<string> vector1;

std::copy(
    (std::istream_iterator< std::string >( input_stream )), std::istream_iterator< std::string >()
  , std::back_inserter( vector1 )
);

The std::istream_iterator< std::string > pair will iterate over the input_stream by extracting an std::string at a time (a string is read until a whitespace character is found). std::back_inserter will call push_back into your vector for each of those strings.

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you need stringstream? Why can't you read directly from std::cin as I did in my solution? Or there is something I'm missing? –  Nawaz Oct 19 '11 at 18:18
    
@Nawaz: Because it seems to me that the OP only wants to split a single line from std::cin. –  K-ballo Oct 19 '11 at 18:22

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