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Take the following contents of a file:

"52245"
"528"
"06156903"
"52246"
"530"
"00584709"

What pattern would match both 52245 and 52246 but nothing else?

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5  
You should edit and refine the question and say why "52245" and "52246" are "good" numbers (5-digit, beginning with 522, Iowa zip codes) and why the others aren't. –  schnaader Apr 23 '09 at 17:03
    
Regexes are based on patterns. If you don't tell us what the pattern is, we can only guess and will probably be wrong. :) –  JP Alioto Apr 23 '09 at 17:09
    
Let me guess: Iowa City? –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 23 '09 at 17:12
    
I guess that leaves me out (Waverly, IA 50677) –  Brad Gilbert Apr 23 '09 at 17:44
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3 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Something that can only match those two numbers and nothing else:

^\"5224[56]\"$

Now if you're looking for something a bit more general (for example, any number with 5 digits), you'll want something like

^\"\d{5}\"$

I'm assuming the quotation marks (") are part of the file. If they aren't, omit the \" parts from the expression.

The particular grep expression you want is this:

grep -E "^\"[[:digit:]]{5}\"$" filename

or to take a suggestion from the comments:

grep -P "^\"\d{5}\"$" filename

I've tested both and they work on my machine!

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Yes the quotation marks are part of the file. I am using grep like this: grep ^\"\d{5}\"$ myfile It returns nothing, I have also tried with -G and -E options Any ideas what is wrong? –  awharrier Apr 23 '09 at 17:05
1  
\d is a Perl style special character. Try grep -P ^\"\d{5}\"$ . I think there are other ways to match digits without -P and \d, but they're not worth it. –  David Berger Apr 23 '09 at 17:08
    
Take care to escape everything from your shell though. In bash, that means using single quotes around the regexp. –  David Schmitt Apr 23 '09 at 17:10
    
i'm not sure that the \d{} is correct...I use [[:digit:]]\{5\}..and you should put " around your expression (use grep with -e too). –  LB40 Apr 23 '09 at 17:10
    
I've included your suggestion into the answer, David Berger. Good tip. I didn't know about -P until now. –  Welbog Apr 23 '09 at 17:12
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^(52245|52246)$

You can use this.

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Technically correct. I'm almost sure he's looking for something else, but wasn't specific about what. –  Max Schmeling Apr 23 '09 at 17:00
    
You forgot the quotation marks. –  Michael Myers Apr 23 '09 at 17:11
1  
+1 for making me laugh –  Tomalak Apr 23 '09 at 17:12
    
@mmyers Oops, didn't see the "grep" tag. I supplied a java regex where quoties would not be used. –  Brian Knoblauch Apr 23 '09 at 17:29
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^"5224[56]"$

^"5224(5|6)"$

^"52{2}4[56]"$

^"(52245|52246)"$

...

You should base the regex you use on the semantic you want to express. If you are looking for two arbitrary numbers use ^"(52245|52246)"$. If the numbers have any meaning - a type code or something like that - I would stick with ^"5224(5|6)"$.

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