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Some basic testing suggests that serialization to JSON using JavaScriptSerializer takes twice as long on anonymous types as it does on a similarly looking non-anonymous type.

Sample code:

namespace ConsoleTestApp
{
    public class Program
    {
        protected class Sample
        {
            private static int count = 0;
            public bool Alpha;
            public int Beta;
            public string Gamma = String.Format("count: {0}", count++);
        }

        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();

            int count = 100000;
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                Sample sample = new Sample();
                string result = serializer.Serialize(sample);
            }

            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var anon = new { Alpha = true, Beta = 1, Gamma = String.Format("count: {0}", count) };
                string anonResult = serializer.Serialize(anon);
            }
        }
    }
}

The result, using the built in profiler in VS2010 (premium ed.):

The result, using the built in profiler in VS2010 (premium ed.)

When I first noticed this, I thought "Of course, because it's anonymous, and the serializer has to inspect it to know what to serialize". But this gut reaction seemed wrong after I considered for a moment that an anonymous type is still statically typed to the compiler, it's just anonymous. So, hypothetically the serializer has just as much information about the anonymous type as it does the non-anonymous type. Or is this incorrect? (Or, alternatively, is my above test flawed?)

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1 Answer 1

Just taking a stab here, but it might be because you're making new 'anon' types each time you do your loop. This would mean that the serializer has to work out if it's already made a template for serialization for this type before or not.

Try this test instead:

int count = 100000;
Sample sample = new Sample();
for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
{
    string result = serializer.Serialize(sample);
}

var anon = new { Alpha = true, Beta = 1, Gamma = String.Format("count: {0}", count) };
for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
{
    string anonResult = serializer.Serialize(anon);
}

And then post the results of that. If there are any performance improvements such as "I already serialized THAT object" then the above test should also take that into consideration for both the defined and anon types.

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1  
Good thought. Similar results, however. (~30% for non-anon, and ~65% for anonymous) –  Matt Oct 20 '11 at 16:56

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