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I am writing a program that calls several other functions from main.c. In main.c, I'm to open a file of 33 ints and put the first ten into an array (a []). SIZE is ten. The 11th int is to be stored in a variable to be used later as a seach target, which is why I called it target. I have tried a few different methods of trying to get the 11th int into target. This gives me a logic error. Could someone explain to me where the error is? My understanding is that a logic error makes syntactical sense, but something in the code doesn't make sense, like trying to use a verb instead of a preposition. I'm not sure if I'm too new at this to see the error or if I've been staring at it for too long. The output shows the array is filled correctly, but the target is always 0, so the 11th int gets placed in the next array. The code is just a fragment.

Thanks for any help!!

int main (void)
    {
         int a[SIZE];
         int i;
         int j;
         int trgt[1];
         int target;
         FILE* fpmyfile;
         int closeResult;

    printf("Function working 1.\n");

         fpmyfile = fopen("MYFILE.DAT", "r");                     // open file myfile
    printf("Function opening file.\n");
            if(!fpmyfile)
                {
                     printf("Could not open input file.\n");
                     exit (101);
                }
            else printf("The file opened.\n");

    printf("Starting for loop.\n");

         for(j = 1; j <= 3; j++)
            {
                 for(i = 0; i <= SIZE - 1; i++)                    //get ints from myfile into array
                     {
                       if(i != SIZE)
                          fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &a[i]);
                       else if(i = SIZE)
                            fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &trgt[i]);
                     }

            target = trgt[1];

    printf("Scan a done.\n");
    printf("\nScanned into a[]");
    printf("Target is %3d\n.", target);   //This print statement says that target is 0
share|improve this question
    
Are you missing a closing } in your first for, or your indentation is just awkward? – K-ballo Oct 19 '11 at 19:02
 for(i = 0; i <= SIZE - 1; i++)

The usual way to write this is for(i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i). Note the less than instead of less or equal. Using preincrement instead of postincrement is not really important in C.

 if(i != SIZE)
     fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &a[i]);
 else if(i = SIZE)
     fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &trgt[i]);

In your else if you are performing an assignment: i = SIZE. This is interpreted in the context of the conditional as ( i = SIZE ) != 0. You actually want a comparisson there: i == SIZE, but still i will never equal SIZE since the loop ends just one before SIZE.

To read n ints into an array, and a following int in a different place, do this:

for( i = 0; i < n; ++i ) // reads n ints
{
     fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &a[i]);
}
fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &target); // reads an additional int into target
share|improve this answer
    
I like the final form of this code better than the original post's. The original post is outlined in the logical way a person would think of the issue though. So I would like to add, @Piseagan keep working on the semantics of the language for now, and the style and optimization of the code will come easier to you later. – James Oct 19 '11 at 19:12
    
Oh,, thanks! This worked and makes sense. I liked this one since was concise. From the comments below, I learned that to show equality, I need '==', because '=' is the assignment operator. Also, the index of an array starts with 0 not 1. – Piseagan Oct 19 '11 at 20:55

I believe your problem is that where you wrote &trgt[i] you meant &trgt[0] (and most programmers would use the semantically equivalent trgt), also when you reassign to target you probably mean target=trgt[0].

Also in your second if you used a single = where I suspect you intended a ==.

Not sure how you ended up here but it seems to me that you can scanf directly into the target variable if you want to.

share|improve this answer

Your error is with this code:

             for(i = 0; i <= SIZE - 1; i++)                    //get ints from myfile into array
                 {
                   if(i != SIZE)
                      fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &a[i]);
                   else if(i = SIZE)
                        fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &trgt[i]);
                 }

The line else if(i = SIZE) has two mistakes, first you need the == operator, not the = operator.

The second error with the line is that it should read else if(i == SIZE - 1).

The if before it, if(i != SIZE), is incorrect as well, I am guessing you want if(i != SIZE - 1). If you did this you can simplify your last else if( i == SIZE - 1) to simlply else.

As a side note, it is always a good idea to surround your if and else blocks with {}'s to prevent other logical errors if you insert a second line in the future.

So in summary change that section to this:

             for(i = 0; i <= SIZE - 1; i++)                    //get ints from myfile into array
                 {
                   if(i != SIZE - 1) {
                      fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &a[i]);
                   }
                   else {
                        fscanf(fpmyfile, "%d", &trgt[i]);
                   }
                 }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help! Some of the coding in C just doesn't come naturally yet. – Piseagan Oct 19 '11 at 20:57

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