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once again, a bit surprised not to find an answer to this one...

the real-world reason for my asking is: I have a dictionary of constants in a class

class MySQLConstants():

  DECIMAL = 0
  TINY = 1
  SHORT = 2
  LONG = 3
  FLOAT = 4
  DOUBLE = 5

  ... etc.

and I want a dictionary so I can find the constant if given the number... easy enough:

fieldTypeDic = {}
for fieldType in dir( MySQLConstants ):
   value = getattr( MySQLConstants, fieldType )
   fieldTypeDic[ value ] = fieldType

... it would be easy enough to make this a @static method of MySQLConstants and call it by going MySQLConstants.createDic(), after the class definition statement has executed... but I was just wondering whether there's any way to get a method, inevitably @static, to run when a class (NB I'm not talking about creating an instance of this class!) is created...

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Instead of creating a dict, you can also do lookups directly using getattr(MySQLConstants, 'TINY') –  Raymond Hettinger Oct 19 '11 at 19:07
    
... except that I want to get the name of the constant from a provided number... –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 19:12
    
Declare the constants as a dictionary to begin with, autogenerate the reverse dictionary, and use __getattr__ to make them look like class members. –  Russell Borogove Oct 19 '11 at 19:33
    
@RussellBorogove sorry, I'm not clear... when you say "autogenerate" ... this will presumably have to occur inside a method... so aren't we back to the original question of a method which is called on creation of a class? –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 20:00
    
@mikerodent - I was suggesting something along the lines of Ethan Furman's second example. –  Russell Borogove Oct 19 '11 at 20:39
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4 Answers 4

Here is a solution that uses a metaclass:

class ConstantDictMeta(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        fieldTypeDic = dict((v, k) for k, v in dct.items() if k.isupper())
        dct["fieldTypeDic"] = fieldTypeDic
        return type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)

class MySQLConstants():
    __metaclass__ = ConstantDictMeta
    DECIMAL = 0
    TINY = 1
    SHORT = 2
    LONG = 3
    FLOAT = 4
    DOUBLE = 5

>>> MySQLConstants.fieldTypeDic
{0: 'DECIMAL', 1: 'TINY', 2: 'SHORT', 3: 'LONG', 4: 'FLOAT', 5: 'DOUBLE'}
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works for me... thanks –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 19:38
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You could create a metaclass that adds behavior when a class is created, but your use-case is simple enough to just extract the dictionary directly when you need it:

>>> class MySQLConstants:
  DECIMAL = 0
  TINY = 1
  SHORT = 2
  LONG = 3
  FLOAT = 4
  DOUBLE = 5

>>> vars(MySQLConstants)
{'__module__': '__main__', 'SHORT': 2, 'DOUBLE': 5, 'DECIMAL': 0, 'FLOAT': 4, 'LONG': 3, 'TINY': 1, '__doc__': None}
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vars()... excellent. Never heard of it! –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 19:10
    
except that... I'd then have to reverse the mapping each time I wanted to do a lookup... which would take time each time –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 19:16
    
@mike rodent: Yeah it would take dozens of nanoseconds. –  Jochen Ritzel Oct 19 '11 at 19:38
    
This doesn't solve the problem of looking up, say, 3. –  Ethan Furman Oct 19 '11 at 19:41
    
@JochenRitzel but I haven't got dozens of nanoseconds to spare... I'm a little bit crazy and like to spend my valuable nanoseconds making slightly offbeam and over-literal answers to Stack Overflow posts –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 19:47
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To answer the question directly, yes:

class MySQLConstants():

    DECIMAL = 0
    TINY = 1
    SHORT = 2
    LONG = 3
    FLOAT = 4
    DOUBLE = 5

    def create_dict(cls):
        fieldTypeDic = {}
        if not isinstance(cls, dict):
            cls = cls.__dict__
        for key, value in cls.items():
            if isinstance(value, int):
                fieldTypeDic[ value ] = key
        cls['fieldTypeDic'] = fieldTypeDic
    create_dict(vars())
    create_dict = classmethod(create_dict)

Notice the rewrite of create_dict, in particular assigning it as a classmethod after calling it during class creation.

If this is a one-shot use method, I would be inclined to go with this:

class MySQLConstants():
    lookup = {}
    local = vars()
    for i, name in enumerate('DECIMAL TINY SHORT LONG FLOAT DOUBLE'.split()):
        local[name] = i
        lookup[i] = name
    del local, i, name

This creates all the names, and creates a reverse lookup dictionary, in one nice tidy package.

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um... I tried your first bit of code and it came up with AttributeError: 'stringmap' object has no attribute 'dict'. Nevertheless, this appears to show that by passing "cls" as a param there is indeed a method of the kind I'm looking for. Thanks for showing this to me. Will pursue experiments... –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 19:52
    
As for your second example, I'm assuming that the numbering given to the constants is not entirely arbitrary... so we may want, for example, to have different integer types grouped in a particular range of numbers (although in reality the MySQLdb assignment of these numbers doesn't seem to provide much rational grouping... (although it does a bit...) –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 19:56
    
later: sorry, too much beer... of course the choice of the param name "cls" has got nothing to do with it... but you've done something very clever... I shall try to understand what it is tomorrow morning! –  mike rodent Oct 19 '11 at 20:09
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

it was far simpler, in fact, than using a Metaclass, and no "classmethod" turns out to be needed:

class MySQLConstants():
  DECIMAL = 0
  TINY = 1
  SHORT = 2
  LONG = 3
  FLOAT = 4
  DOUBLE = 5

  def create_dict( dicForReversing ):
    fieldTypeDic = {}
    for key, value in dicForReversing.items():
      if isinstance(value, int):
        fieldTypeDic[ value ] = key
    return fieldTypeDic
  fieldTypeDic = create_dict( vars() )

but thanks to Ethan Furman in particular for showing that things can be made to happen during the creation of a class

NB if you anticipate having multiple values for your keys (this is the case with MySQLdb constants) the best way to handle this might be as follows

ENUM = 247

CHAR = TINY
INTERVAL = ENUM  

def create_dict( dicForReversing ):
  fieldTypeDic = {}
  for key, value in dicForReversing.items():
    if isinstance(value, int):
      if not value in fieldTypeDic: 
        fieldTypeDic[ value ] = set()
      fieldTypeDic[ value ].add( key )
  return fieldTypeDic
fieldTypeDic = create_dict( vars() )
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