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The way I understand it is Java EE 6 includes the classes for java.ws.rs (JAX-RS) which are defined in the JSR 311 spec document. But I don't know why you would use Jersey or Apache CXF if the base classes are already built into Java EE 6. Can you not create a RESTful web service with those classes alone? Are Jersey, Apache CXF, etc just frameworks to make development of REST-based web services easier?

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why you would use Jersey or Apache CXF if the base classes are already built into Java EE 6. Can you not create a RESTful web service with those classes alone?

Java EE only defines standards, those classes are the standard API, but there is no implementation behind them. Jersey and CXF are competing implementations of the standard.

However, if you have a server that claims to support Java EE 6, it will have to contain an implementation for every API that's in the standard. For example, Glassfish includes Jersey, so you don't have to add it explicitly.

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+1 for the 2nd paragraph. That's almost certainly the source of the OP's confusion. –  Matt Ball Oct 19 '11 at 20:05
    
Are there any app servers which claim to support the whole EE6 spec? Glassfish, i suppose. JBoss 7 is only certified for the web profile, and has some major bits missing from the rest (remote EJBs, for instance!). Or is JAX-RS part of the web profile? –  Tom Anderson Oct 19 '11 at 20:46
    
The "no implementation behind them" part is where I'm getting confused. Implementation of what? Perhaps it's a terminology problem I'm having. I instantiate classes and implement interfaces. That javax.ws.rs package contains classes as well as interfaces that I can instantiate and implement in my application without Jersey or CXF. What does Jersey do different than that? –  Big Andy Oct 19 '11 at 20:48
    
@Tom: according to Wikipedia, Websphere V8 and Fujitsu Interstage are both fully Java EE 6 certified: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Michael Borgwardt Oct 19 '11 at 22:02
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@Tom: yeah; I saw it for the first time as well. Apparently made specifically for Windows Azure and very new - interesting combination. –  Michael Borgwardt Oct 20 '11 at 9:42
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JAX-RS is just a specification. In order to use JAX-RS, you need an implementation of the spec.

Jersey is a JAX-RS implementation. Specifically, it is the reference implementation.

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