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Although the program works perfectly fine, my professor mentioned that the following is a logical error and should be fixed. I'm stumped, isn't there only one root when the discriminant is equal to 0? Help will truly be appreciated!

This is the code he mentioned:

     if(discrim == 0) 
     { 
         eq1root1 = ((-1*coefB) + Math.sqrt(discrim))/(2 * coefA);
         System.out.println("This equation only has a single real root. Root = " + eq1root1);

Here's the full code:

import java.lang.Math;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane; 

public class Assignment6
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    String a, 
           b,
           c; 
  double coefA,
         coefB,
         coefC,
         discrim,
         eq1root1,
         eq1root2;

  //Here the user is inputting the coefficients through a popup dialog box
  //Then the entered Strings are being converted to floating point numbers.  

  a = JOptionPane.showInputDialog( "Please enter a number for the quadratic coefficient a" ); 
  coefA = Double.parseDouble (a);        
  b = JOptionPane.showInputDialog( "Please enter a number for the quadratic coefficient b" );
  coefB = Double.parseDouble (b);  
  c = JOptionPane.showInputDialog( "Please enter a number for the quadratic coefficient c" );
  coefC = Double.parseDouble (c);  

   //Here the coefficients that the user entered are being displayed. 

   System.out.println("Your coefficient  a = " + coefA);
   System.out.println("Your coefficient  b = " + coefB);
   System.out.println("Your coefficient  c = " + coefC);

  //The following "nested if" statement sorts out equations with only 1 root, 2 roots, and or no roots at all.  
   discrim = coefB*coefB - (4 * coefA * coefC);
   if(discrim == 0) 
     { eq1root1 = ((-1*coefB) + Math.sqrt(discrim))/(2 * coefA);
      System.out.println("This equation only has a single real root. Root = " + eq1root1);
     }  
   else  if (discrim > 0)
   { eq1root1 = ((-1*coefB) + Math.sqrt(discrim))/(2 * coefA);
     eq1root2 =((-1*coefB) - Math.sqrt(discrim))/(2 * coefA);
     System.out.println("This equation has two real roots."); 
     System.out.println("Root 1 = " +  eq1root1); 
     System.out.println("Root 2 = " + eq1root2);
   }
   else 
   {
      System.out.println("This equation does not have any real roots."); 
   }

 }
}
share|improve this question
    
please tag as homework –  alf Oct 19 '11 at 21:09
    
This is an old comment, but just an fyi we're in the process of eliminating the homework tag. So if you see a question with the homework tag, please remove it! :-) –  corsiKa Dec 1 '12 at 20:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Only error I can see is that you don't really need to do:

 eq1root1 = ((-1*coefB) + Math.sqrt(discrim))/(2 * coefA);

You can do only

 eq1root1 = -1*coefB/(2 * coefA);

Since you're inside the if where you know the descriminant is zero.

Like mentioned in another comment, you need to make sure that coefA is different from 0, since that will cause your code to raise an exception (you can't divide by 0). Although that wouldn't actually be a quadratic equation, it's important to validate it.

share|improve this answer
1  
That makes sense! Thank you so much! Didn't realize that -__-! –  junaidkaps Oct 19 '11 at 21:13
    
Glad to be of help. :) If it does solve your problem, please consider accepting the answer ;) –  pcalcao Oct 19 '11 at 21:15

Think about this equation in terms of math:

((-1*coefB) + Math.sqrt(discrim))/(2 * coefA);

What happens when coefA = 0 ?

share|improve this answer
1  
Right side becomes undefined :-) –  junaidkaps Oct 19 '11 at 21:25
1  
For pure math, that or infinity. But IIRC Java will throw an exception. Either way, it's a special case that you need extra logic to handle. Print out some sort of error message - for example, "This isn't a quadratic equation". I've marked students off for this type of bug before. –  Izkata Oct 19 '11 at 21:48

I can only guess here... What professor was probably trying to say is that you cannot really use == to compare doubles.

For example,

public static void main(String[] args) {
    double v = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        v += 0.01;
    final double w = 1;
    System.out.println("v = " + v);
    System.out.println("w = " + w);
    if (v - w != 0.0) {
        System.out.println("difference: " + (v - w));
    }
}

will print the following:

v = 1.0000000000000007
w = 1.0
difference: 6.661338147750939E-16
share|improve this answer

Consider what happens if doubles don't accurately represent numbers properly:

C:\Documents and Settings\glowcoder\My Documents>java Assignment6
Your coefficient  a = 1.0
Your coefficient  b = 0.2
Your coefficient  c = 0.01
This equation has two real roots.
Root 1 = -0.09999999868291098
Root 2 = -0.10000000131708903

I constructed this example with (x + .1)^2 which should have 1 solution. The expansion is x^2 + .2x + .01.

You also aren't handling when a = 0

C:\Documents and Settings\glowcoder\My Documents>java Assignment6
Your coefficient  a = 0.0
Your coefficient  b = 1.0
Your coefficient  c = 1.0
This equation has two real roots.
Root 1 = NaN
Root 2 = -Infinity
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