Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

in Access DB... I need to extract the itemcode / desc combination for each itemcode in the following table where the desc has been used most frequently.

most frequently could possibly mean that there was only one version (see added record for pear)

in the case of itemcode 777, I'll have to decide later which description version to use. if there are multiple records, each containing a single version of a description, that will definately create an additional problem.

the original question should probably also include returning the first row for itemcodes like 777 where all the existing records for an itemcode contain a single, unique description (so that the count would always be 1). the first row may not always be the correct version - but I won't be able to automate that phase anyway.

---------------------
itemcode  | desc
---------------------
123       | apple
123       | apple
123       | apple
123       | apple 2
123       | apple-2
001       | orange
001       | orange
001       | ORANGE 1
001       | orange-1
666       | pear
777       | bananananana
777       | banana

so - I'm looking to end up with the following:

---------------------
itemcode  | desc
---------------------
123       | apple
001       | orange
666       | pear
777       | bananananana

I think I'm close, but the following only gets the description in the database which appears most frequently and only returns one row.

SELECT itemcode, desc, count(desc)
from table
group by itemcode, desc
having count(desc) = 
(
 select max(ct) from 
 (
  select itemcode, desc, count(desc) as ct
  from table
  group by itemcode, desc
  )
);

returns:

---------------------
itemcode  | desc
---------------------
123       | apple
share|improve this question
    
Changed (and bug-fixed) my answer to account for the changed question. –  Tomalak Apr 23 '09 at 19:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This would work through a correlated sub-query:

SELECT 
  t.itemcode, t.desc, Count(t.desc) AS CountOfdesc
FROM 
  [table] AS t
GROUP BY 
  t.itemcode, t.desc
HAVING 
  Count(t.desc) IN (
    SELECT TOP 1 
      Count(i.desc)
    FROM 
      [table] AS i
    WHERE 
      i.itemcode = t.itemcode
    GROUP BY 
      i.itemcode, i.desc
    ORDER BY 
      Count(i.desc) DESC
  )
  AND t.desc = (
    SELECT TOP 1 
      i.desc
    FROM 
      [table] AS i
    WHERE 
      i.itemcode = t.itemcode
    GROUP BY 
      i.itemcode, i.desc
    ORDER BY 
      i.desc
  )
;

Returns (tested with Access 2003):

itemcode  desc          CountOfdesc
001       orange        2
123       apple         3
666       pear          1
777       banana        1

BTW you should really not be calling a table "table" and a column "desc". Those are reserved SQL keywords, just avoid them to make your life easier.

share|improve this answer
    
"table" and "desc" were just stand-ins, not the real names. –  m42 Apr 23 '09 at 18:37
    
@42: Good. :) –  Tomalak Apr 23 '09 at 18:39
1  
Yes, confirmed working in Access 2003. What version do you use? –  Tomalak Apr 23 '09 at 18:49
1  
Confirmed working as well –  DJ. Apr 23 '09 at 18:55
    
Brilliant! Super! Awesome! –  m42 Apr 23 '09 at 19:53

Your query returns the MAX. Find a way to create a rule that would satisfy your requirements.

That "which appears most frequently" means what? appears>2? appears>3? appear>4?...

share|improve this answer
    
It could only appear 1 time. I would want that as well. –  m42 Apr 23 '09 at 18:06
    
Look at JP's answer. Maybe that will be enough for what you're looking for. :-) –  MarlonRibunal Apr 23 '09 at 18:15

Fixed and tested. It works as exspected - or better as designed, because it returns all rows if the highest count for an ItemCode appears several times.

SELECT ItemCode, ItemDescription, COUNT(ItemDescription) AS ItemCount
FROM Items I1
GROUP BY ItemCode, ItemDescription
HAVING COUNT(ItemDescription) = 
   (SELECT MAX(ItemCount)
      FROM (
         SELECT COUNT(ItemDescription) AS ItemCount
         FROM Items I2
         WHERE I2.ItemCode = I1.ItemCode
         GROUP BY ItemDescription
      ) I3
   )

UPDATE

Just simplifed the query a bit.

UPDATE

Unable to verify if it works with Access 2003. Tryed it, but Access keeps asking for I1.ItemCode.

share|improve this answer
    
all the data is in one table. (not actually called table). this doesn't work for me. –  m42 Apr 23 '09 at 18:24
2  
Unfortunately, this won't work with Jet SQL. The engine does not support nested correlated sub-queries, AFAIR. –  Tomalak Apr 23 '09 at 18:39
    
Just tested it with SQL 2005 and I don't use Access so I cannot say if it works with access. –  Daniel Brückner Apr 23 '09 at 18:42
    
I know... The MS Jet engine is just not capable of some of the nicer things you can do on SQL server. –  Tomalak Apr 23 '09 at 18:52
    
yep. access has really crippled my brain when it comes to sql. –  m42 Apr 23 '09 at 18:56

Wait, why can't you just order by the count and take the top however many you want? Do I misunderstand your question? For example ...

SELECT TOP N itemcode, desc, count(desc) AS [Count] FROM table
GROUP BY itemcode, desc
ORDER BY [Count]

Okay, how about this ...

;WITH dt AS
(
  SELECT 
  ROW_NUMBER() OVER 
  ( PARTITION BY itemcode ORDER BY COUNT([desc])DESC ) AS 'RowNumber',
  COUNT([desc]) AS [Count],
   itemcode,
   [desc] 
   FROM [table]
   GROUP BY itemcode, [desc]
)
SELECT * FROM dt WHERE dt.RowNumber = 1

Will that stop the h8? :)

Ahhh Access! I give up!

share|improve this answer
    
This will not work. 123 Apple 50 times 123 Apple2 60 times 001 Orange 20 times - select top 2 and you get 2 entries for 123 but none for 001. –  Daniel Brückner Apr 23 '09 at 18:09
    
sorry, that doesn't work for me. –  m42 Apr 23 '09 at 18:15
    
Ah, I see know, okay. –  JP Alioto Apr 23 '09 at 18:18
    
WTF? Posting T-SQL code will not go over well on a MS Access question.. –  DJ. Apr 23 '09 at 20:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.