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Most examples of monads I saw in C# are written somewhat like that:

public static Identity<B> Bind<A, B>(this Identity<A> a, Func<A, Identity<B>> func) {
    return func(a.Value);
}

For example, see http://mikehadlow.blogspot.com/2011/01/monads-in-c-3-creating-our-first-monad.html.

The question is, what is the point of requiring func to return an Identity<B> ? If I use the following definition:

public interface IValue<A> {
    public IValue<B> Bind<B>(Func<A, B> func)
}

then I can actually use same func for for Lazy<T>, Task<T>, Maybe<T> etc without actually depending on actual type implementing IValue.

Is there something important I am missing here?

share|improve this question
    
Could you provide a link to the example? –  Eric Andres Oct 19 '11 at 21:52
    
The first one? It is from mikehadlow.blogspot.com/2011/01/…. Added that link to the original question. –  Andrey Shchekin Oct 19 '11 at 22:12
1  
The Bind you define in IValue<T> is actually a map or lift function (in C# usually called Select) –  Mauricio Scheffer Oct 19 '11 at 22:54
    
So only thing Bind adds over Lift is a 'flattening' in the case where function does actually return a monad of the same type? –  Andrey Shchekin Oct 19 '11 at 23:39
1  
'flattening' is one way to see it (in Scala bind is called flatMap), but think of a Maybe<T> monad: with map alone you can't go from "something with a value" to "no value" so you wouldn't be able to break the computation. –  Mauricio Scheffer Oct 20 '11 at 0:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 27 down vote accepted

First off, consider the notion of composition. We can express composition as an operation on delegates easily:

public static Func<T, V> Compose<T, U, V>(this Func<U, V> f, Func<T, U> g)
{
    return x => f(g(x));
}

So if I have a function g which is (int x) => x.ToString() and a function f which is (string s) => s.Length then I can make a composed function h which is (int x) => x.ToString().Length by calling f.Compose(g).

That should be clear.

Now suppose I have a function g from T to Monad<U> and a function f from U to Monad<V>. I wish to write a method that composes these two functions that return monads into a function that takes a T and returns a Monad<V>. So I try to write that:

public static Func<T, Monad<V>> Compose<T, U, V>(this Func<U, Monad<V>> f, Func<T, Monad<U>> g)
{
    return x => f(g(x));
}

Doesn't work. g returns a Monad<U> but f takes a U. I have a way to "wrap" a U into a Monad<U> but I don't have a way to "unwrap" one.

However, if I have a method

public static Monad<V> Bind<U, V>(this Monad<U> m, Func<U, Monad<V>> k)
{ whatever }

then I can write a method that composes two methods that both return monads:

public static Func<T, Monad<V>> Compose<T, U, V>(this Func<U, Monad<V>> f, Func<T, Monad<U>> g)
{
    return x => Bind(g(x), f);
}

That's why Bind takes a func from T to Monad<U> -- because the whole point of the thing is to be able to take a function g from T to Monad<U> and a function f from U to Monad<V> and compose them into a function h from T to Monad<V>.

If you want to take a function g from T to U and a function f from U to Monad<V> then you don't need Bind in the first place. Just compose the functions normally to get a method from T to Monad<V>! The whole purpose of Bind is to solve this problem; if you wave that problem away then you don't need Bind in the first place.

UPDATE:

In most cases I want to compose function g from T to Monad<U> and function f from U to V.

And I presume you then want to compose that into a function from T to V. But you can't guarantee that such an operation is defined! For example, take the "Maybe monad" as the monad, which is expressed in C# as T?. Suppose you have g as (int x)=>(double?)null and you have a function f that is (double y)=>(decimal)y. How are you supposed to compose f and g into a method that takes an int and returns the non-nullable decimal type? There is no "unwrapping" that unwraps the nullable double into a double value that f can take!

You can use Bind to compose f and g into a method that takes an int and returns a nullable decimal:

public static Func<T, Monad<V>> Compose<T, U, V>(this Func<U, V> f, Func<T, Monad<U>> g)
{
    return x => Bind(g(x), x=>Unit(f(x)));
}

where Unit is a function that takes a V and returns a Monad<V>.

But there simply is no composition of f and g if g returns a monad and f doesn't return the monad -- there is no guarantee that there is a way to go back from the instance of the monad to an "unwrapped" type. Maybe in the case of some monads there always is -- like Lazy<T>. Or maybe there sometimes is, like with the "maybe" monad. There often is a way to do it, but there is not a requirement that you can do so.

Incidentally, notice how we just used "Bind" as a Swiss Army Knife to make a new kind of composition. Bind can make any operation! For example, suppose we have the Bind operation on the sequence monad, which we call "SelectMany" on the IEnumerable<T> type in C#:

static IEnumerable<V> SelectMany<U, V>(this IEnumerable<U> sequence, Func<U, IEnumerable<V>> f)
{
    foreach(U u in sequence)
        foreach(V v in f(u))
            yield return v;
}

You might also have an operator on sequences:

static IEnumerable<A> Where<A>(this IEnumerable<A> sequence, Func<A, bool> predicate)
{
    foreach(A item in sequence)
        if (predicate(item)) 
            yield return item;
}

Do you really need to write that code inside Where? No! You can instead build it entirely out of "Bind/SelectMany":

static IEnumerable<A> Where<A>(this IEnumerable<A> sequence, Func<A, bool> predicate)
{
    return sequence.SelectMany((A a)=>predicate(a) ? new A[] { a } : new A[] { } );  
}

Efficient? No. But there is nothing that Bind/SelectMany cannot do. If you really wanted to you could build all of the LINQ sequence operators out of nothing but SelectMany.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your response, however I still have a question. In most cases I want to compose function g from T to Monad<U> and function f from U to V. For example, I want to add 5 to Lazy<int>, so 5+() is a function f from int to int, but I have a Monad<int> (Lazy, from some previous function call). So the unwrapping case is still relevant, but why would I want 5+() function to return a monad? Why can't I do both unwrapping and re-wrapping within a Bind function? –  Andrey Shchekin Oct 19 '11 at 22:42
    
@AndreyShchekin The point is that the Bind operation is not designed to (only) solve the kind of problem you just described. To put it another way, Bind is overkill for that sort of problem. –  Daniel Pratt Oct 19 '11 at 23:15
    
@DanielPratt but what is designed for this problem? Functions in my case can not just be composed directly, because I need to understand how to apply a given operation to an internal value of the monad. –  Andrey Shchekin Oct 19 '11 at 23:28
1  
Someone already mentioned this in a comment to your question, but it appears you are looking for an operation that is generally called map. The .NET framework calls it Select. Take a look at the type of the Enumerable.Select method: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb548891.aspx It has pretty much the type you gave to Bind in your question. –  Daniel Pratt Oct 19 '11 at 23:33
1  
@AndreyShchekin: I've updated my answer to respond to your second question. –  Eric Lippert Oct 20 '11 at 4:31

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