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I have two files, one of the test.py is

import new.py

class Test:

    def __init__(self):
        return
    def run(self):
        return 1

if __name__ == "__main__":
    one=Test()
    one.run()

and new.py

class New:
    def __init__(self):
        one.run()

New()

Now when i run python test.py I get this error,

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 1, in <module>
    import new.py
  File "/home/phanindra/Desktop/new.py", line 5, in <module>
    New()
  File "/home/phanindra/Desktop/new.py", line 3, in __init__
    one.run()
NameError: global name 'one' is not defined

But I want to use this instance of one in my New!! Can I do this??

edit:

I want to access the variable in test.py in new.py to do some process and give them back to test.py. Isn't this possible?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want your New class to use the instance of Test you created, you have to pass it in as part of the constructor.

new.py

class New:
    def __init__(self, one):
        one.run()

test.py

import new

class Test:
    def __init__(self):
        return
    def run(self):
        return 1


if __name__ == "__main__":
    one=Test()
    two = new.New(one);

Playing around with globals is a great way to break your code without realizing how you did it. It is better to explicitly pass in the reference you want to use.

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but I want them in two different files!! I want to access the variable in test.py in new.py to do some process and give them back to test.py. Isn't this possible? –  pahnin Oct 19 '11 at 22:11
    
@pahnin: You can have them in to different file, this just happens to be the way I first wrote it. See edit. –  unholysampler Oct 19 '11 at 23:12
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No, you can't. The closest you can get is to pass the thing you need in to the constructor:

class New(object):
    def __init__(self, one):
        one.run()
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You can, but you shouldn't ;-) –  schlamar Oct 19 '11 at 22:06
    
@ms4py: Yes, good point. I meant to say something to that effect. Cycles in the dependency tree are fun, but not good. –  nmichaels Oct 19 '11 at 22:07
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one is defined inside the if __name__=='__main__' block. Consequently, one will get defined only if test.py is run as a script (rather than imported).

For the module new to access one from the test module, you'll need to pull one out of the if __name__ block:

test.py:

class Test:
    def __init__(self):
        return
    def run(self):
        return 1

one=Test()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    one.run()

Then access one by the qualified name test.one:

new.py:

import test

class New:
    def __init__(self):
        test.one.run()

New()
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but its not the ssame instance as the intial one(), I mean if I did some math on a variable in inital one that will not be accessable from the new importin new.py –  pahnin Oct 19 '11 at 22:05
    
Sharing a state on module level is not a good idea. @unholysampler posted the "right" solution by passing a reference. –  schlamar Oct 19 '11 at 22:06
    
@pahnin: It is the same one. Try it and see. –  unutbu Oct 19 '11 at 22:09
    
No, it isn't. I've tried –  pahnin Oct 19 '11 at 22:12
    
@pahnin: Please show your code. –  unutbu Oct 19 '11 at 22:14
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