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How can I test wether a variable has been declared or assigned (i.e. check if "a" is defined, when I expect a program to call some code like this (def a (create-a)) ?

And related --- how does the answer to this question relate to the problem of resolving a symbol (i.e. a function) which has been declared ? Clojure: determine if a function exists

It seems like a defined variable should be checkable in the same sense that a defined function is, but I'm finding that the solution for determining if a function exists is not sufficient for determining wether a variable exists.

Some context : I'm writing unit tests for a multideveloper project, and want to make sure that the test data, and the methods in different classes have been defined. Since there is no good IDE support for clojure, it seems to me that, given its loose structure, it is good to test method names and variable names existence before testing their outputs / content.

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I see that resolve is already mentioned in the post you linked to, can you describe where it falls short for your use case? –  Paul Oct 19 '11 at 22:20
    
Yes. I noticed this but was wondering about the single qoute vs. double qouted method use in the linked example. How is this different from (resolve (symbol "my-function-isnt-a-symbol")) used for resolving functions ? –  jayunit100 Oct 20 '11 at 4:52
1  
possible duplicate of How to determine if symbol is bounded (var defined)? –  Goran Jovic Oct 22 '11 at 23:00
    
possible duplicate of In clojure how can I test if a a symbol has been defined? –  om-nom-nom Mar 31 '13 at 10:18
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use resolve to see if the variable was bound/defined:

(resolve 'meaning)
nil

(def meaning 42)
#'user/meaning

(resolve 'meaning)
#'user/meaning

or you can boolean check it, if you need true/false:

(boolean (resolve 'meaning))
true
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Yes, thats the right answer :) –  jayunit100 Oct 20 '11 at 4:51
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One way to do this is to use ns-resolve, for example:

user=> (def a "hello a")
user=> (ns-resolve *ns* 'a)
#'user/a
user=> (ns-resolve *ns* 'b)
;nil                    ; This assumes b hasn't been defined before...

Note that if you namespace-qualify the symbol to be checked then what you pass as first argument (*ns* in the example above) doesn't matter:

user=> (ns-resolve 'user 'a)
#'user/a
user=> (ns-resolve 'other 'a)
nil
user=> (ns-resolve 'other 'user/a)
#'user/a

The resolve function mentioned by @tolitius is actually a shorthand for ns-resolve where the namespace argument always evaluates to ns, depending on the use case it might be more handy.

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As others have said, resolve will return the var for a symbol if there is one defined, or nil. Further, you can check if the var has a value bound to it by using bound?.

user=> (resolve 'foo)
nil
user=> (def foo)
#'user/foo
user=> (resolve 'foo)
#'user/foo
user=> (bound? #'foo)
false
user=> (def foo 5)
#'user/foo
user=> (bound? #'foo)
true
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Since there is no good IDE support for clojure it seems to me that, given its loose structure, it is good to test method names and variable names existence before testing their outputs / content.

This is nuts. You really want a test to say "Oops! You forgot to define foobar!" instead of just trying to run foobar and seeing Clojure's "Unable to resolve symbol" message?

What do you gain from this? You lose the stacktrace, which could be useful if, for example, the test is passed the wrong function name by some other code. Much better to know what line mis-spelled foobar than to search through your whole test namespace.

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well, "unable to resolve symbol foobar" could be because a namespace was not correctly imported. a unit test which imports all the names correctly verifies that the ant unresolved symbols are , in fact, due to ns import errors, rather than truly missing resources... (was recently working on a massive php code base, and found that unit tests for variables , methods, and resources were absolute life-savers on multideveloper projects with external dependencies and multiple namespaces). –  jayunit100 Oct 20 '11 at 4:44
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