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I have code that looks like this:

module A
    def b(a)
      a+1
    end
end
class B
   include A
end

I would like to write a method in the class B that looks sort of like this

class B
   def b(a)
      if a==2     # are you sure? same result as the old method
         3
      else
         A.b(a)
      end
   end
end

How do I go about doing this in Ruby?

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you meant "module A" ... not method A ... ? And returning '3' in case of a==2 is probably not a good case, because that's the same result as the original b(a) method -- this way you won't see the difference –  Tilo Oct 19 '11 at 22:55
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You want the super function, which invokes the 'previous' definition of the function:

module A
  def b(a)
    p 'A.b'
  end
end

class B
  include A

  def b(a)
    if a == 2
      p 'B.b'
    else
      super(a) # Or even just `super`
    end
  end
end

b = B.new
b.b(2) # "B.b"
b.b(5) # "A.b"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, didn't know that worked with modules. Thought it was only for super classes. –  davorb Oct 19 '11 at 23:12
2  
You don't even need to pass (a) to super. Just super without any arguments (but no empty parentheses) passes all arguments and any block to the superclass method. –  d11wtq Oct 20 '11 at 0:45
1  
@vodnik, modules are inserted into the inheritance hierarchy when you call include, so generally speaking, they behave like superclasses when used as mixins. –  d11wtq Oct 20 '11 at 3:40
    
@d11wtq Thanks for the note on parentheses, guess this would come down to preference, for the sake of clarity I'm gonna leave them in. –  connec Oct 20 '11 at 17:46
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class B
  alias old_b b  # one way to memorize the old method b , using super below is also possible

  def b(a)
    if a==2
        '3'     # returning a string here, so you can see that it works
    else
      old_b(a)   # or call super here
    end
  end
end



ruby-1.9.2-p0 >   x = B.new
 => #<B:0x00000001029c88> 
ruby-1.9.2-p0 > 
ruby-1.9.2-p0 >   x.b(1) 
 => 2 
ruby-1.9.2-p0 > x.b(2)
 => "3"
ruby-1.9.2-p0 > x.b(3)
 => 4 
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