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I'm trying to generate class files with the "-g:vars" option. This is working fine for classes and I get the parameter name as it is in the source. But this doesn't seem to be working for Interfaces.

e.g. Interface public interface Test

{
    public abstract void doesntWork(String name, String last, int id);
}

=======Generates==========

//  (version 1.6 : 50.0, no super bit)
public abstract interface Test {

  // Method descriptor #4 (Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;I)V
  public abstract void doesntWork(java.lang.String arg0, java.lang.String arg1, int arg2);
}

while...

public class Test
{
    public void doesntWork(String name, String last, int id) {}
}

===========Generates (only relevant part shown)============

 public void doesntWork(java.lang.String name, java.lang.String last, int id);
    0  return
      Local variable table:
        [pc: 0, pc: 1] local: this index: 0 type: Test
        [pc: 0, pc: 1] local: name index: 1 type: java.lang.String
        [pc: 0, pc: 1] local: last index: 2 type: java.lang.String
        [pc: 0, pc: 1] local: id index: 3 type: int

I'm guessing this is due to the fact that Local variable table is not applicable to Interfaces. How do I get the debugging info as it is for Interfaces too?

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1 Answer 1

Well, where are you going to see the parameter names from the interface? Every single implementing class will provide its own names—what's the point of storing interface's ones?

share|improve this answer
    
to downvoter—care to explain? –  alf Oct 19 '11 at 23:02
    
Agreed, but then shouldn't the "-g" debugging behavior be consistent over interfaces and classes alike. Ofcourse, the names could be overwritten in the implementing class. Vote up requires 15 rep points. Can I know the downvoter by any chance? –  sErVerdevIL Oct 20 '11 at 13:07
    
It shouldn't: there's no way to use those names for debugging. Hence, no need to store those. It's not "could be overwritten"—it's "must and will be overwritten" –  alf Oct 20 '11 at 13:10
    
I'm the down-voter - sorry, thought it was obvious, which means I probably misread where you were coming from. It seemed like a pointless "sour grapes" answer - if you can't have it, you must not want it anyway. And there are lots of tool-ware applications where you'd want the names - generating subclasses, documenting tests, creating UML, etc. And it's not an answer - it's a comment. –  Ed Staub Oct 20 '11 at 18:30
    
@EdStaub agreed, thank you. –  alf Oct 20 '11 at 18:35

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