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I am trying to implement parameterized class in Java with enum as a type parameter. Everything works fine, except, if you look at the code below, there is that anonymous class Car.Creator with parameter K. But of course, instead of K, there should be CarObject<T>, but it's not that easy. If I put CarObject<T> in K's place, then I got syntax error. Could someone explain if something like this is possible and maybe provide with some code sample.

public class CarObject<T extends Enum<T>>
{
  public Map<T, String> values;
  private Class<T> typeClass;

  public CarObject(Class<T> clazz)
  {
    typeClass = clazz;
    values = new EnumMap<T,String>(typeClass);
  }


  public static final Car.Creator<K> Creator = new Car.Creator<K>()
  {
    public K create()
    {
      return new K();
    }


    public K[] newArray(int size)
    {
      return new K[size];
    }
  }
}

I can give you an example from official Android documentation(look at the code in 'Class Overview') where this works perfectly fine. I think there is some magic going on under the hood in Android. I'm trying to do exactly the same thing - implement Parcelable interface. I just made up this example without implements Parcelable and other stuff, because I though maybe it's just a syntax sugar :).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm no Android expert, but I'm pretty sure there's nothing magic about how this is happening in Android. I think you're just confused about the relationship between generic type arguments and statics.

Generic type arguments (like T in your example) belong to the instances of the class, not to the class itself.

Static members (like Creator in your example) belong to the class itself, not to the instances of the class.

The fact that Creator is an anonymous inner class implementing a generic interface is a bit of a red herring here. The issue is simply that, regardless of what Creator is, as long as it is static, it can't access the type T.

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I think that in Android this particular object must be static. From the Android docs: "Classes implementing the Parcelable interface must also have a static field called CREATOR, which is an object implementing the Parcelable.Creator interface." –  janisg Oct 20 '11 at 0:18
    
So then, the final question is - if there exists any other way how to pass this class with generic type to the Creator? –  janisg Oct 20 '11 at 0:26
    
@janisg: I think that means that classes that implement Parcelable cannot be generic. Unfortunately, I don't know enough about the Parcelable interface to help you out further. Perhaps you should create a new, more specific question, since you're out of the realm of Java and generics now. –  Daniel Pryden Oct 20 '11 at 0:49

Look at the following statement -

public static final Car.Creator<K> Creator = new Car.Creator<K>() {
    public K create() {
        return new K();
    }
    public K[] newArray(int size) {
        return new K[size];
    }
}; // <------ missing a semicolon here

Looks like you have a generic class Creator defined as static inner class in the class Car. And, here your trying to use it and instantiate it, so can not use K here unless it's a class or an interface defined somewhere.

I think the following example explains what I mean -

// you are not defining a class here so no parameter instead use a real class
public static final List<K> list = new List<K>() { /*....*/ };
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As I mentioned already, K is just the placeholder for this example. I want to put CarObject<T> in palce of K. –  janisg Oct 19 '11 at 23:49
    
Yes I understand what you mean, but K is there just to illustrate the location in code where I want to place CarObject<T>. –  janisg Oct 19 '11 at 23:57
    
@janisg: Because you used the static modifier, the Creator object is a static member of the CarObject class, not of any specific instantiation of CarObject. So it can be accessed as CarObject.Creator. As such, it doesn't have any access to the T type variable, which only has a value for specific concrete instantiations of CarObject like CarObject<SomeSpecificEnum>. You can either have a creator that can create CarObject<SomeSpecificEnum>s, or a creator that is static, but not both. –  Daniel Pryden Oct 20 '11 at 0:05

Make the method non-static as per the compiler message, but you have several other major design problems anyway. create() needs a clazz from somewhere, and you can't return generic arrays.

EDIT I don't normally post code solutions but you seem pretty confused.

public class CarObject<T extends Enum<T>>
{

    public Map<T, String> values;
    private Class<T> typeClass;

    public CarObject(Class<T> clazz)
    {
        typeClass = clazz;
        values = new EnumMap<T, String>(typeClass);
    }
    public final Car.Creator<CarObject<T>> Creator = new Car.Creator<CarObject<T>>()
    {

        @Override
        public CarObject<T> create()
        {
            return new CarObject<T>(typeClass);
        }

        @Override
        public CarObject<T>[] newArray(int size)
        {
            return new CarObject[size];
        }
    };
}
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Yes I can return new K(), because I have working code for that with basic non parametric class - when instead of K there is CarObject without parameter, for example. –  janisg Oct 19 '11 at 23:36
1  
@janisg No you can't. The compiler says so. You can return new CarObject<T>(typeClass);. Not the same thing. –  EJP Oct 19 '11 at 23:43
    
I can give you an example from official Android documentation(look at the code in 'Class Overview') where this works perfectly fine. I think there is some magic going on under the hood in Android. I'm trying to do exactly the same thing here - implement Parcelable interface. I just made up this example, because I though maybe it's just a syntax sugar :). –  janisg Oct 19 '11 at 23:44
    
@janisg: If K is a concrete type, then yes you can (that's what it is in the Android example). If K is a generic type parameter, then no you can't. –  Daniel Pryden Oct 20 '11 at 0:01
    
If K is CarObject then it's OK and if K is CarObject<T> it won't work? Right? –  janisg Oct 20 '11 at 0:04

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