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What's the preferred method to add module functionality to library ruby code?

Consider the following:

module MyExceptions
    class SomethingBadHappenedTheLibarayDesignerDidntConsider < StandardError; end
end

How can I add MyExceptions module to a class that I don't control?


Update, in my_library_class_exceptions.rb I did:

class LibraryClass
    include MyExceptions
end
module MyExceptions
    class SomethingBadHappenedTheLibarayDesignerDidntConsider < StandardError; end
end

But the console returns: NameError: uninitialized constant LibraryClass::MyExceptions

share|improve this question
    
You need to make sure your files are named correctly for autoloading to work. MyExceptions should be in "my_exceptions.rb". Where have you put this file? – d11wtq Oct 20 '11 at 0:40
    
the library class I want to override is called Samurai, so I put all the code listed in my update in a empty filed called: app/models/samurai.rb – SooDesuNe Oct 20 '11 at 1:07
    
That file won't be loaded automatically. When you reference MyExceptions and MyExceptions is not a known constant, auto-loading kicks in and a file name my_exceptions.rb is looked for. You'll either have to include the file manually, or name it according to its contents. – d11wtq Oct 20 '11 at 3:42

In Ruby, you can open the definition of any class later and change it.

Below is a contrived example for overriding division to use a custom exception by reopening a previously created class.

class Foo
  def divide(a, b)
    a/b
  end
end

foo = Foo.new()
foo.divide(1, 0)

module MyExceptions
  class MyDivisionError < StandardError; end
end

class Foo
  include MyExceptions
  alias old_divide divide
  def divide(a, b)
    old_divide(a, b)
  rescue ZeroDivisionError
    raise MyDivisionError
  end
end

foo.divide(1, 0)
share|improve this answer
    
see my edit.... – SooDesuNe Oct 19 '11 at 23:36

Looking at your update, the simple reason it doesn't work is the order: you use MyExceptions before it's defined. The fixed version of your file - reopening the library class:

require 'thelib'

module MyExceptions
    class SomethingBadHappenedTheLibarayDesignerDidntConsider < StandardError; end
end
LibraryClass.class_eval do
    include MyExceptions
end

This class eval trick is arguably a safer way for reopening class than simply class LibraryClass again: it will warn you if you missed the classname.

BTW: I don't really see how you're planning the use MyException then.. that would probably mean some more monkey patching and/or wrapping parts of the library.

UPDATE: the above assumes you have thelib.rb in the same directory with at least the following content:

class LibraryClass
end
share|improve this answer
    
I reorganized per your suggestion, still getting the same NameError. – SooDesuNe Oct 20 '11 at 3:29
    
strange. I updated the answer by making sure we are on the same page. Please check again. – inger Oct 20 '11 at 8:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I got this working by fixing a few things, and changing a few things.

  1. It turns out LibraryClass wasn't actually a class, but a module. So I changed:

    class LibraryClass include MyExceptions end

into to:

module LibraryClass
    module MyExceptions
        class SomethingBadHappenedTheLibarayDesignerDidntConsider < StandardError; end
    end
end
  1. Then I moved library_class.rb into lib\library_class_extensions.rb and made sure that lib was part of the autoload path.
  2. Then in an initializer, I called require 'library_class_extensions'

I think that's a better pattern for the behavior I was trying to accomplish anyway, since this really is more of library type code that app/model type code.

I'm up-voting the answers given by everyone, for their heroic efforts.

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