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I have a complex type in my program that results in very long line lengths. Here it is:

List<FruitCallback<Fruit>>

Here's an example of where the line of code is simply too long and confusing:

private static Dictionary<Type, List<FruitCallback<Fruit>>> callbacks = new Dictionary<Type, List<FruitCallback<Fruit>>>();

I can create an alias for it by subclassing it like so:

class FruitCallbacks : List<SomeClass.FruitCallback<Fruit>> { }

But I could of sworn I remember reading somewhere about a way to alias something like this such that an empty class would not be necessary.

share|improve this question
    
You can at least use the var keyword on the left side of the assignment to save typing and enhance readability. – Eric J. Oct 19 '11 at 23:43
    
Yeah, I'm aware of the var keyword but I have to repeat this several other places where the var keyword cannot be used. – Ryan Peschel Oct 19 '11 at 23:44
    
DarthVader's answer is what you need – GianT971 Oct 19 '11 at 23:47
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can add a fully qualified using statement to your class file (in the using directives section) to alias the class. It's a bit verbose.

using MyType = System.Collections.Generic.List<YourNamespace.FruitCallback<YourNamespace.Fruit>>;

And then you can MyType in place of List<FruitCallback<Fruit>> in your code.

Full working example.

// aliased outside the namespace
using MyList = System.Collections.Generic.List<Bar.FruitCallBack<Bar.Fruit>>;

namespace Bar
{
    // alternately, can be aliased inside the namespace 
    // using MyList = System.Collections.Generic.List<FruitCallBack<Fruit>>;        

    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            var myList = new MyList();
        }
    }

    public class FruitCallBack<T> { }
    public class Fruit { }
}
share|improve this answer

you can do this:

using Foo =  List<FruitCallback<Fruit>>;

Then you can use Foo everywhere you need to use List<FruitCallback<Fruit>> Example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using Foo =  List<FruitCallback<Fruit>>;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
      Foo f = new Foo();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Just to mention, you have to add this line next to the using directives (you never know if someone was going to use it within a class) – GianT971 Oct 19 '11 at 23:46
2  
You also need to fully qualify the type. See Anthony's answer. – Kyle Trauberman Oct 19 '11 at 23:47
    
Hah, I tried something exactly like this but it wouldn't compile because I was outside of a namespace. I tried it again within a class and it didn't work so I asked this question. Apparently it has to be within a namespace but not within a class. – Ryan Peschel Oct 19 '11 at 23:47
1  
@RyanPeschel It doesn't need to be in a namespace. If it isn't in a namespace, you just need to fully qualify it. Like: using Foo = System.Collections.Generic.List<string>; – lonewolf Oct 19 '11 at 23:52
1  
@DarthVader Adding System.Collections.Generic will not work. You need to fully qualify it. See Anthony's answer. – lonewolf Oct 19 '11 at 23:53

Maybe you were thinking of aliasing a type through a using statement?

using MyType = MyCompany.MyProject.DataAccess.Interfaces.MyType;
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