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I am converting a bunch of code from C++ in to C. Is there an equivalent pattern in C for a Object factory?

Consider the following source code. Based on a parameters (int type) the ObjectFactory() function should return a void pointer to an struct of a pedicure type. How can I instantiate the struct in a way that I can have a pointer to it after the function returns.

typedef struct {
    unsigned int a; 
    unsigned int b; 
    unsigned int c; 
} CThings ; 

typedef struct {
    unsigned int d; 
    unsigned int e; 
    unsigned int f; 
} CPlaces ; 

void * ObjectFactory( int type ) {

    switch( type ) {
        case 5 : {          
            return ??? CPlaces ; 
            break; 
        }
        case 35 : {         
            return ??? CThings ; 
            break; 
        }
        default: {
            // unknown type 
            return NULL ; 
        }
    }

    return NULL ; 
}



int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    void * p = ObjectFactory( 5 ); 

    // Do soemthing with the pointer. 
    CPlaces * places = (CPlaces*) p ; 

    places->d = 5 ; 
    places->e = 6 ; 
    places->f = 7 ; 


    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
4  
This, translating C++ to C, seems at first glance to be a particularly daft exercise. Would you care to explain the reasons why you're engaged in such an apparently pointless activity? – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 20 '11 at 0:00
2  
@AlfP.Steinbach +1: Best comment you ever wrote. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 20 '11 at 0:01
1  
@Mooing Duck, You can't do that, as I said in my questions, This is C not C++, and the 'new' keyword does not exists. – Steven smethurst Oct 20 '11 at 0:07
1  
Why even use the term object if C is an Imperative programming language – Itsik Oct 20 '11 at 0:07
1  
@Itsik: Object Orientation does not preclude an imperative style in a language. C++ is certainly not declarative, though it is object oriented. (though you are of course correct; no objects in C) – Ed S. Oct 20 '11 at 0:14
up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about using malloc:

case 5: return malloc(sizeof(struct CPlaces));

No need for the break if you already return. If you like, you can add some initialization before returning.

The caller will have to know the actual type so she can cast the pointer back to the correct type. This will probably amount to a duplicate switch statement at the caller's site.

share|improve this answer
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef enum enum_ObjectType {
    CPlaces_Object = 5,
    CThings_Object = 35,
} ObjectType;

typedef struct struct_CThings {
    unsigned int a;
    unsigned int b;
    unsigned int c;
} CThings;

typedef struct struct_CPlaces {
    unsigned int d;
    unsigned int e;
    unsigned int f;
} CPlaces ;

void *ObjectFactory(ObjectType type) {
    switch( type ) {
        case CPlaces_Object: {
            return malloc(sizeof(CPlaces));
            break;
        }
        case CThings_Object: {
            return malloc(sizeof(CThings));
            break;
        }
        default: { /* unknown type */
            return NULL;
        }
    }
    return NULL;
}

int main(void) {
    CPlaces *places = ObjectFactory(CPlaces_Object);
    CThings *things = ObjectFactory(CThings_Object);

    things->a = 2;
    things->b = 8;
    things->c = 4;

    places->d = 5;
    places->e = 7;
    places->f = 3;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, that isn't quite equivalent to a C++ object factory. I'd expect my objects to be initialized to something other than garbage. I'd suggest taking a varargs parameter and to also have "constructor" functions that wrap malloc and initialization. Those constructors can be overloaded to take varargs and call the "real" constructors after unpacking the varargs. – Michael Price Oct 20 '11 at 1:32
    
Let's please not mess around with varargs. If the types are really related, and it's also reasonable to create a factory for them, then we should logically expect to be able to construct any of them with a common set of arguments. I mean, using varargs, we basically need to know which constructor will be passed anyway, which in turn means we have to know which type we're creating, so we might as well create it directly. – Karl Knechtel Oct 20 '11 at 1:53
    
@Michael Price, If you don't want random garbage call calloc instead of malloc ;D – Angel O'Sphere Oct 20 '11 at 14:54
    
@AngelO'Sphere calloc still doesn't initialize my "members" to what I want them to be. If the goal is to emulate C++ objects in C, then this is a must. OOP in C isn't impossible, it's just very verbose. – Michael Price Oct 20 '11 at 15:30
    
@MichaelPrice Technically, there is nothing preventing you from specifying a function to initialize the struct before being returned. But, as you said, implementing the class machinery in plain C takes a lot of drudgery. – Sinan Ünür Oct 20 '11 at 17:07

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