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So I currently have this:

array(0=>'foo', 1=>'bar', 3=>'baz', 4=>'boo', 5=>'wahoo');

What I want is this:

array(0=>'foo', 3=>'baz', 1=>'bar', 5=>'wahoo', 4=>'boo');

This is a simplified example, my actual array is much larger and more complex so it can't easily be broken into smaller pieces and re-assembled.

I've been using uksort to attempt this, which I think is the best way forward but can't seem to get the results I want.

Edit:

I think my simplified example is actually confusing the issue. Here is my actual array and what I want to end up with.

Array
(
    [1820] => Safety
    [1821] => Security
    [1822] => Digital Life
    [1893] => Privacy and Digital Footprints
    [1823] => Connected Culture
    [1824] => Respecting Creative Work
    [1825] => Searching
    [1826] => Research and Evaluation
    [1836] => Self-Expression and Identity
)

Array
(
    [1820] => Safety
    [1821] => Security
    [1822] => Digital Life
    [1893] => Privacy and Digital Footprints
    [1823] => Connected Culture
    [1836] => Self-Expression and Identity
    [1824] => Respecting Creative Work
    [1825] => Searching
    [1826] => Research and Evaluation
)

So I almost have a numeric sort with two items pulled out of sequence.

share|improve this question
    
Is it a numerical or associative array? –  Jared Farrish Oct 20 '11 at 0:20
    
The keys are numerical –  Mark Ferree Oct 20 '11 at 0:24
1  
@Jared - as soon as the keys are out of order it is associative (technically it's always associative with some special handling when php sees numbers). –  evan Oct 20 '11 at 0:25
    
What is the sort criteria? E.g. Why is baz to be before bar but boo behind wahoo? –  hakre Oct 20 '11 at 9:09
    
Is there any logic to the order of your items? Or do you want to manually change the order of some items to whatever position you want while keeping their keys? –  evan Oct 20 '11 at 19:34
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

New answer based on discussion.

Do use uksort()

Do a switch in the compare function for the ones that match and change them.

Example that works for your example above.

function updateKey($key)
{
   switch($key)
   {
     case 1893:
       return 1822.5;

     case 1836:
       return 1823.5;

     default:
       return $key;
   }
}

function cmp($a, $b) 
{
    $a = updateKey($a);
    $b = updateKey($b);

    // you must do the compare this way for floats (instead of just subtracting) because php implemented the compare callback poorly
    if ($a == $b) 
    {
        return 0;
    }

    return ($a < $b) ? -1 : 1;
}

uksort($array, 'cmp');
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You're actually looking for uasort.

That will let you use your own sorting function and preserve the keys.

uksort sorts based on the keys, not the values.

Example:
http://codepad.viper-7.com/E8oZ2g

function cmp($a, $b) {
    if ($a == $b) {
        return 0;
    }
    return ($a < $b) ? -1 : 1;
}

// Array to be sorted
$array = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'b');

echo "<pre>";
print_r($array);
echo "</pre>";

// Sort and print the resulting array
uasort($array, 'cmp');
echo "<pre>";
print_r($array);
echo "</pre>";

Output:

Array
(
    [0] => a
    [1] => b
    [2] => c
    [3] => b
)

Array
(
    [0] => a
    [3] => b
    [1] => b
    [2] => c
)
share|improve this answer
    
Will it preserve numeric indices? –  Jared Farrish Oct 20 '11 at 0:25
1  
In the example, keys move with the values. That's what uasort does see the added example. –  evan Oct 20 '11 at 0:30
    
True (as you see, I was wondering about it). The only thing I'd add is that a foreach() loop is required to access the new array's order: codepad.viper-7.com/kQuwis. (And I would prefer your code in the answer too, not just in the codepad page, but +1 anyway.) –  Jared Farrish Oct 20 '11 at 0:37
    
so if I want to end up with codearray(0=>'foo', 5=>'wahoo', 1=>'bar', 3=>'baz', 4=>'boo');code as my final result using uasort how do I proceed. As I understand it codeif($a == 'wahoo') return -1`code` should float it all the way to the top, but how do I stop at a certain point? –  Mark Ferree Oct 20 '11 at 0:39
    
You can't "stop" the sorting. If you have some special algorithm that does the sorting, you put that as the compare function. But it must work when comparing each value to each other value. –  evan Oct 20 '11 at 0:42
show 3 more comments
//randomize array preserving keys
function shuffle_assoc( $array )
{
   $keys = array_keys( $array );
   shuffle( $keys );
   return array_merge( array_flip( $keys ) , $array );
}

Source: http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.shuffle.php

Note that this returns a new array, it doesn't modify the input array.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I think the random in the title threw it off, the items which move are important. I meant that the resulting order wasn't predictable in any way. –  Mark Ferree Oct 20 '11 at 0:34
1  
What kind of formula or function do you want to use to go from the original array to the result array? are they sorted in any particular order or are you just assigning them manually? –  Brian Glaz Oct 20 '11 at 0:40
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