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Can anyone see what I'm doing wrong here? The Assert.IsTrue(parses) always fails.

    [TestMethod]
    public void Can_Parse_To_DateTime()
    {
        DateTime expected = new DateTime(2011, 10, 19, 16, 01, 59);
        DateTime actual;

        string value = "Wed Oct 19 16:01:59 PDT 2011";
        string  mask = "ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss xxx YYYY";

        bool parses = DateTime.TryParseExact(value, mask, 
                                             CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, 
                                             DateTimeStyles.None, 
                                             out actual);

        Assert.IsTrue(parses);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }

I have also tried it thus, with the same result:

    [TestMethod]
    public void parsing()
    {
        DateTime expected = new DateTime(2011, 10, 19, 16, 01, 59);
        DateTime actual;

        string value = "Wed Oct 19 16:01:59 PDT 2011";
        string  mask = "ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss YYYY"; // note removal of "xxx "

        value = value.Remove(20, 4);  // removal of the "PDT "
        bool parses = DateTime.TryParseExact(value, mask, 
                                             CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, 
                                             DateTimeStyles.None, 
                                             out actual);

        Assert.IsTrue(parses);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }
share|improve this question
    
The year should be "yyyy" (lower case), but I'm not sure there's any format string that will interpret "PDT". –  Matt Hamilton Oct 20 '11 at 1:00
    
@MattHamilton - that's the answer! changed it and it works. Post as an answer and I'll accept it. –  ScottSEA Oct 20 '11 at 1:04
    
Let @Al have the rep. :) –  Matt Hamilton Oct 20 '11 at 1:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As noted by Matt Hamilton, yyyy must be lowercase. And xxx is totally invalid. You can always test your format string using reverse method DateTime.ToString(format,CultureInfo.InvariantCulture).

share|improve this answer
    
According to this previous question you can replace timezone string with timezone offset and it will work - stackoverflow.com/questions/241789/… –  Paige Cook Oct 20 '11 at 1:12
    
Really like that you gave the option to try a reverse check. It hadn't occurred to me when I had similar pains. Still not a total fix for the OP, but a step in the right direction. –  Tim Meers Oct 20 '11 at 1:37
 string mask = "ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss PDT yyyy";
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