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I just need a bit of feedback regarding a problem I am trying to solve...

Here is a description of the problem :

My company sells some products for which the customer can pay over a certain period of time. The customers are classed as existing or new. In order to let the customers buy the product, we check the credit worthiness and on occasions a customer can be asked to deposit a bond, which is refundable. Some customers have a good payment history with us, so we don't need to charge them a bond amount. In order to implement the assessment, I have designed a solution as follows:

public interface ICreditAssessor
{
    CreditAssessment Process();
    Decimal CalculateBond(BondCalculator bc);
}

Two classes are defined which implement this interface.

public class GoodClientProcessor : ICreditAssessor{
    ..... methods
}

public class OtherClientProcessor : ICreditAssessor{
    ..... methods
}

There is a class which returns the appropriate processor depending on whether the customers have a good payment history with us or not.

Also, I have implemented a BondCalculator as follows:

public class BondCalculator
{
    List<IRiskEvaluator> riskEvaluators;

    public BondCalculator()
    {
        riskEvaluators = new List<IRiskEvaluator>();
    }

    public Decimal GetSuggestedBond()
    {
        Decimal riskAmount = 0;
        foreach (IRiskEvaluator ire in riskEvaluators)
        {
            Decimal tempRisk = ire.EvaluateRisk();

            if (tempRisk > riskAmount)
            {
                riskAmount = tempRisk;
            }
        }

        return riskAmount;
    }

    public void SetRiskEvaluator(IRiskEvaluator re)
    {
        this.riskEvaluators.Add(re);
    }
}

Interface IRiskEvaluator is as follows:

public interface IRiskEvaluator
{
    Decimal EvaluateRisk();
}

The two classes implementing this interface are as follows:

public class FinancialRiskEvaluator : IRiskEvaluator
{
    Decimal IRiskEvaluator.EvaluateRisk()
    {
        ... calculate risk amount
    }
}

and

public class ProductRiskEvaluator : IRiskEvaluator
{        

    Decimal IRiskEvaluator.EvaluateRisk()
    {
        ... calculate risk amount
    }
}

Now calling all this is done via a method. The relevant code is as below:

ICreditAssessor creditAssessor = CreditAssessorFactory.GetAssessor(somecriteria);
CreditAssessment assessment = creditAssessor.Process();
.
.
.
BondCalculator bc = new BondCalculator();
bc.SetRiskEvaluator(new FinancialRiskEvaluator(xmlResults));
bc.SetRiskEvaluator(new ProductRiskEvaluator(productCost));
creditCheckProcessor.CalculateBond(bc);

Is this design OK or can it be improved any further? One issue I see is that as the customers with good payment history do not need a bond, I still need to call the method CalculateBond and return 0 for the bond value. This somehow does not feel right. Can this somehow be improved upon? Any comments/suggestion are appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
This design is okay but definetely complicated; seems a bit over engineered for two different types of customers in my honest opinion. It seems as though the ICreditAssessor interface has CalculateBond already defined and thus implemented in both the GoodCustomer and OtherCustomer classes. The function that returns risk is a simple greater than comparison so I don't see why this couldn't be done in this function rather than sending it a serpate list of BondCalculators. I'd like to reiterate, this design is perfectly fine and will work for as long as it's not a first year maintaining it. – Magnum Oct 20 '11 at 1:31
    
italic don't see why this couldn't be done in this function rather than sending it a serpate list of BondCalculators. italic The reasoning for me was that if any other kind of risk evaluator was needed, it would be easy to add one rather than modifying existing code. – mukul singh Oct 20 '11 at 2:43
1  
I like the design you've laid out, and I like phoog's suggestion of a "BondRequired" property. Without seeing more of the system or understanding the problem domain better, I think it would be premature to say that your design is "too complicated". Especially because it can be tricky to figure out how much code to include when you post a question like this. To some developers a bunch of procedural code is "simpler" than an OO heavy design, with other developers its the opposite. – Paul Batum Oct 20 '11 at 4:34
    
I like the design you've laid out, and I like phoog's suggestion of a "BondRequired" property. If I were to add this property to ICreditAssessor, would that make the code more easy to understand: if (creditAssessor.IsBondRequuired()){ //calculate bond BondCalculator bc = new BondCalculator(); bc.SetRiskEvaluator(new FinancialRiskEvaluator(xmlResults)); bc.SetRiskEvaluator(new ProductRiskEvaluator(productCost)); creditCheckProcessor.CalculateBond(bc); } – mukul singh Oct 20 '11 at 6:07

You could add a boolean BondRequired property to make the intent explicit, rather than depending on people to infer that "a bond of zero doesn't make much sense; the developer must have intended that result to represent no bond at all."

However, I agree with Magnum that this is already more complicated than seems necessary, so adding more members to the type may not be the best thing to do.

share|improve this answer
    
I used to have a much more simpler solution when there were no interfaces. If adding interfaces makes it look complicated, then under what circumstances would I be using them? – mukul singh Oct 20 '11 at 4:06
    
The complexity may well be justified. I said that it seems to be more complex than necessary, but that assessment was based on a superficial understanding of the problem. – phoog Oct 20 '11 at 4:17

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