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I am writing a program to compare two files. For each line in file 1, I want to compare it to all lines in file 2, then continue with the next line in file 1. The program is not continuing in file 1 after the first hit. Any suggestions?

Code: Select all

#! /usr/bin/env python

import sys
import fileinput

# Open the two files
f1 = open(sys.argv[1], "r")
f2 = open(sys.argv[2], "r")

for line in f1:
    chrR,chrStart,chrEnd,name,score,strand1,codingStart,codingEnd,itemRbg,blockCount,blockSize,BlockStart = line.strip().split()
    chr = range(int(chrStart), int(chrEnd))
    lncRNA = set(chr)
    for line in f2:
        chrC,clustStart,clustEnd,annote,score,strand = line.strip().split()
        clust = range(int(clustStart), int(clustEnd))
        cluster = set(clust)
        if strand1 == '-':
            if chrR == chrC:
                if strand1 == strand:
                    if cluster & lncRNA:
                         print name,annote,'transcript'
                         continue
                     else:
                         continue
                 continue
        break
share|improve this question
    
What is printed if you add print line after the for line in f1? –  Matt N. Nov 8 '11 at 8:10

3 Answers 3

After the first line in f1 you've already read all lines from f2 file therefore for line2 in f2 has zero iteration for the second and following lines in f1 file unless f2 file grows on disk.

#!/usr/bin/env python
import sys

def intersect(r1, r2):
    return r2[0] < (r1[-1]+1) and r1[0] < (r2[-1]+1)

with open(sys.argv[2]) as f2:
     chrC_set, strand_set, clusters = set(), set(), []
     for i, line in enumerate(f2):
         parts = line.split()
         if len(parts) != 6:
            print >>sys.stderr, "%d line has %d parts: %s" % (i, len(parts), line),
            continue
         chrC, clustStart, clustEnd, annote, _, strand = parts
         chrC_set.add(chrC)
         strand_set.add(strand)
         clusters.append((xrange(int(clustStart), int(clustEnd)), annote))

with open(sys.argv[1]) as f1:
     for i, line in enumerate(f1):
         parts = line.split()
         if len(parts) < 6:
            print >>sys.stderr, "%d line has %d parts: %s" % (i, len(parts), line),
            continue
         chrR, chrStart, chrEnd, name, _, strand1 = parts[:6]
         if strand1 == '-' and chrR in chrC_set and strand1 in strand_set:
            lncRNA = xrange(int(chrStart), int(chrEnd))
            for cluster, annote in clusters:
                if intersect(cluster, lncRNA):
                   print name, annote, 'transcript'
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1  
With your definition of intersect(), the result of intersect(xrange(10,21),xrange(20,31)) is False . I don't think it's what you wanted. - Please, see my answer and give me your opinion. –  eyquem Dec 10 '11 at 16:26
    
@eyquem: well spotted. I've updated the answer. The formula works for [start, end) where end must not be in the range (past the last element in the range). –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 10 '11 at 18:10

The test if strand1 == '-' doesn't depend from the contents of f2. Hence you can put it before looping in f2 and launch the exam of all the content of f2 only if the current line of f1 is containing a strand1 with value '-'

Given also the fact that there is first if strand1 == '-' and then if strand1 == strand, it means that you are also interested only by lines in f2 in which the strand has a value '-'.

Moreover, I took the idea of J.F.Sebastian to test the intersection of two ranges without help of sets, but only testing the bounds of the ranges. However, it isn't necessary to use a range nor an xrange, testing the bounds is enough.

So, I propose the following code, as a simple improvement of your algorithm:

for line in f1:
    (chrR,chrStart,chrEnd,name,score,strand1,codingStart,codingEnd,
     itemRbg,blockCount,blockSize,BlockStart) = line.strip().split()
    if strand1 == '-':
        s,e = int(chrStart), int(chrEnd)
        for line in f2:
            chrC,clustStart,clustEnd,annote,score,strand = line.strip().split()
            if strand=='-' and chrR == chrC \
               and int(clustStart)<e and s<int(clustEnd):
                print name,annote,'transcript'
        f2.seek(0,0)

.

However, this algorithm (yours, corrected) is poor: there is a complete reading of the content of f2 for each line of f1 containing a strand1 with value '-'.

The algorithm of J.F.Sebastian is far better.
I improved it just a little, with the ideas expressed above.

with open(sys.argv[2]) as f2:
    clusters = []
    for i, line in enumerate(f2):
        parts = line.split()
        if len(parts) != 6:
            print >>sys.stderr, "%d line has %d parts: %s" % (i,len(parts),line),
            continue
        chrC, clustStart, clustEnd, annote, _, strand = parts
        if strand=='-':
            clusters.append((chrC, int(clustStart), int(clustEnd), annote))

with open(sys.argv[1]) as f1:
    for i, line in enumerate(f1):
        parts = line.split()
        if len(parts) < 6:
            print >>sys.stderr, "%d line has %d parts: %s" % (i,len(parts),line),
            continue
        chrR, chrStart, chrEnd, name, _, strand1 = parts[:6]
        if strand1 == '-':
            for chrC,iclustStart,iclustEnd,annote in clusters:
                if chrR == chrC \
                   and iclustStart<int(chrEnd) and int(chrStart)<iclustEnd:
                    print name, annote, 'transcript'
share|improve this answer
    
1. xrange() is required to check that the boundaries are sane otherwise the formula for intersect() might fail silently. 2. There is no complete reading of f2 for each line in f1; f2 is completely exhausted after the first time it's been read. 3. You are missing if strand == '-' before clusters.append for f2 file. 4. the condition for intersection should be: iclustStart<int(chrEnd) and int(chrStart)<iclustEnd. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 10 '11 at 18:51
    
@J.F.Sebastian You're right for 3 and 4 and I corrected. - Concerning 1, I suppose that clustStart <= clustEnd and chrStart <= chrEnd are always True; is it what you call sane values for the ranges ? - Concerning the point 2, I think you allude to the improvement of Will's algorithm; I corrected. - BTW I upvote your answer. –  eyquem Dec 10 '11 at 19:05
    
1. yes, if start < end 2. quote: "However, your algorithm is poor: there is a complete reading of the content of f2 for each line of f1 containing a strand1 with value '-'." -- it is not correct, after the first time f2 is at eof so the loop breaks immediately i.e., there is no complete reading for each line.. 4. range(start, end) doesn't include end therefore the intersection condition should be <, not <=. In my formula r[-1]+1 == end. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 10 '11 at 19:19
    
@J.F.Sebastian 2. I should have written: Will, the principle of your algorithm is to make a complete reading of the second file for each line read in the first file, but for that you need to move the second file's pointer represented by f2 back to the beginning of the file. However, this algorithm, after addition of f2.seek(), and even after having put the instruction if strand1 == '-' before the loop for line in f2and not inside it, is poor in its principle, apart the fact it is badly written, because there are many repetitions of the complete reading of the second file. –  eyquem Dec 10 '11 at 22:02
    
@J.F.Sebastian 4. Yes, range(start, end) doesn't include end, but xrange(start,end)[-1] isn't end, it is naturally end-1. For example, xrange(10,21)[-1] is 20, not 21. So, when evaluating intersect(xrange(10,21),xrange(20,31)) , there is the comparison 20 as xrange(20,31)[0] < 20 as xrange(10,21)[-1] and that is False though 20 is in range(10,21) AND range(20,31) –  eyquem Dec 10 '11 at 22:12

You are purposely doing a "continue" after finding the first hit. and then also doing a "break" after the first line.

You don't need to do that. The second loop will continue onto the next line in f2 just fine. Then, when it gets to the end of f2 - it'll go onto the next line in f1. If you relaly want to check every line in f1 against every line in f2 then all those continues (and the break) are superfluous.

Try:

for line in f1:
     chrR,chrStart,chrEnd,name,score,strand1,codingStart,codingEnd,itemRbg,blockCount,blockSize,BlockStart = line.strip().split()
    chr = range(int(chrStart), int(chrEnd))
    lncRNA = set(chr)
    for line2 in f2:
            chrC,clustStart,clustEnd,annote,score,strand = line2.strip().split()
            clust = range(int(clustStart), int(clustEnd))
            cluster = set(clust)
            if strand1 == '-':
                    if chrR == chrC:
                            if strand1 == strand:
                                    if cluster & lncRNA:
                                            print name,annote,'transcript'
share|improve this answer
    
f2 has been read to the end after the first line in f1, so without calling f2.seek (or f2 file growing on disk) for line2 in f2 won't return any lines. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 16 '11 at 17:58
    
ok, I'm confused - how does reading hte first line out of f1 also update f2's seek index? –  Taryn East Nov 16 '11 at 18:00
1  
When you are on the 2nd line in the f1 file (i.e. after the 1st line) the for line2 in f2 loop already iterated over all lines in f2 file. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 16 '11 at 18:23
    
Ah I see. Good point. So yes I agree - need a seek to beginning before the "for line2". –  Taryn East Nov 16 '11 at 18:30

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