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I've got the following html/css which is intended to change a sibling element to red if the input element before it has a class of "invalid", My question is what would explain this sibling selector behavior when the first element is an input field?

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>
  <head>
    <style tyle="text/css">
    div.required_text
    {
      color:#008000;
      display:inline;
    }
    input.invalid + div.required_text
    {
      color:#800000;
    }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <p><input type="text" class=""><div class="required_text">Required</div></p>
    <p><input type="text" class=""><div class="required_text">Required</div></p>
    <p><input type="text" class="invalid"><div class="required_text">Required</div></p>
  </body>
</html

If I change my HTML to use a div, this slector is fine

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>
  <head>
    <style tyle="text/css">
    div.required_text
    {
      color:#008000;
      display:inline;
    }
    div.invalid + div.required_text
    {
      color:#800000;
    }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <p><div class="">[mock form element]</div><div class="required_text">Required</div></p>
    <p><div class="">[mock form element]</div><div class="required_text">Required</div></p>
    <p><div class="invalid">[mock form element]</div><div class="required_text">Required</div></p>
  </body>
</html>

EDIT: Ok so it seems there are extra paragraph tags being added to the rendered output when each line is wrapped with paragraph tags which is breaking the sibling selection, what causes this?

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Here is a fiddle so that people can see. Notice how in the first trio everything is green while in the second the last one is red. jsfiddle.net/KnpA9 –  mrtsherman Oct 20 '11 at 2:59
    
I've just discovered by warpping the lines with input fields there are extra paragraph tags being added jsfiddle.net/KnpA9/1 –  Scuzzy Oct 20 '11 at 3:01
2  
You should not put <div> tags inside <p> tags >> google.com/search?q=div+inside+p –  Moak Oct 20 '11 at 3:05
    
Evidently so, which explains my problem. –  Scuzzy Oct 20 '11 at 3:06
    
My answer addresses your edit with examples, if you're interested. –  BoltClock Oct 20 '11 at 3:19
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

try this markup instead

<div><input type="text" class=""><span class="required_text">Required</span></div>

You should not put block elements into inline elements.

from the DTD

<!ELEMENT P - O (%inline;)*            -- paragraph -->

says that paragraphs can online contain 0 or more inline elements

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Where is a block element being placed into an inline element? The input element is an empty inline element, it can't contain any children. –  BoltClock Oct 20 '11 at 3:10
    
i guess p is just a special case –  Moak Oct 20 '11 at 3:15
    
Yes, it's a special case. See here: w3.org/TR/html-markup/p.html –  BoltClock Oct 20 '11 at 3:22
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As mentioned in the comments, you can't nest <div> elements in <p> elements. The spec simply forbids it that way (here's a link). An opening <div> tag will implicitly close a preceding opening <p> tag if it is there, so essentially the DOM structure for your first markup looks like this:

p
  input
div
p
  input
div
p
  input.invalid
div

Rather than this:

p
  input
  div.required_text
p
  input
  div.required_text
p
  input.invalid
  div.required_text

And the DOM structure constructed by your second markup looks like this:

p
div
div.required_text
p
div
div.required_text
p
div.invalid
div.required_text

Rather than this:

p
  div
  div.required_text
p
  div
  div.required_text
p
  div.invalid
  div.required_text

Which makes all your <div>s siblings of their preceding <p>s, rather than children.

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