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I am writing a model for an engineering course. I developed the model and everything related to it in python, and now would like to display my output in a graph, instead of just the values in a table. I have checked with the instructors, and they are perfectly fine with me using an external graphing library. I do not want the library to have to be installed on the computers that my python script will run on, and instead would like to have it as a reference. Does anyone know of a graphing library that doesn't need to be installed? I'm having trouble finding one.

I've looked at python-graph and matplotlib as the best options. I really like matplotlib, but I believe it has to be installed.

Thanks for any help!

EDIT: I just learned that because I chose to use Python, that my program will be run through a command line UNIX server instead of the windows servers that the LabVIEW applications will be run on. Does anyone know of a graphing library for command-line window?

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virtualenv will probably make your "no install" restriction go away. virtualenv.org –  Eddy Pronk Oct 20 '11 at 3:02
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"Installing" is sort of relative... I assume you mean you want pure python libraries, no compiling or binaries? –  Thomas Oct 20 '11 at 3:07
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2 Answers

One option is to let Google render the plots for you, if you don't mind relying on an internet connection. There is even a python wrapper for it, which is very small and pure-python.

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This may help you.If you are using HTML to display the graph

Try Open flash chart and use pyofc2 you dont need to install the pyofc2 just dowload and putt the file in your project directory.

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