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So I'm making a class to define a character in D&D. The way I thought setting up the class was that public members are defined in the header and private in the .cpp so they're not revealed to the outside right? How do you do this? Currently it looks like this and I'm sure it's wrong.

character.h:

namespace d20 {
    class character {
    public:
        character(void);
        virtual ~character(void);

        // get stats
        int getStr();
        int getDex();
        int getCon();
        int getIntl();
        int getWis();
        int getCha();

        // get modifiers of the stats
        int getStrMod();
        int getDexMod();
        int getConMod();
        int getIntlMod();
        int getWisMod();
        int getChaMod();
    };
};

character.cpp:

namespace d20 {
    class character {
    private:
        int str;    // strength
        int dex;    // dexterity
        int con;    // constitution
        int intl;   // intelligence
        int wis;    // wisdom
        int cha;    // charisma

        int hp;     // hit points
        int ac;     // armor class
    };
    character::character(void) {

    }

    character::~character(void) {

    }
}

Yes I know a ton is missing, but that's besides the point. Visual Studio 2010 shows it as 2 classes named character in class view. How do I accomplish what I intended? It doesn't matter much for this since it's an assignment and all the code is visible anyway, but for the future it'd probably be smart to keep private members out of the .h file correct?

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This won't compile. – Dani Oct 20 '11 at 3:11
    
Like I said, I knew that a ton is missing. Though why specifically won't this compile? I'm curious. – Portaljacker Oct 20 '11 at 3:16
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just put private members in the same header file. Class definition cannot be spread across different files by design.

Why do you want prevent those private members from being seen by clients in the first place? Being private, they cannot be accessed directly anyway.

Edit:

Those private members are implementation details of the class. They are necessary to be in the definition of the class because sometimes compiler needs to know the size of objects of the class:

int main()
{
  character ch;

  // pass by value
  Func(ch);
  ..
}

In the above example, the compiler has no way to know the size of ch unless it sees the definition of character, AND it can figure out the size by looking at the class definition! That's one reason why you need put implementations in the class definition.

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True, it's not like any private functions would have to be defined in the header... – Portaljacker Oct 20 '11 at 3:15
    
Private memeber functions must also be "declared" inside class definition. Although they can be "defined/implemented" in different source files if you like. – Eric Z Oct 20 '11 at 3:21

Might be a good idea to move these private declarations to the header file.

private:
    int str;    // strength
    int dex;    // dexterity
    int con;    // constitution
    int intl;   // intelligence
    int wis;    // wisdom
    int cha;    // charisma

    int hp;     // hit points
    int ac;     // armor class
share|improve this answer

you are declaring 2 classes first of all.

one in .h & 1 in .cpp & with the same name. Do you think it will even compile ? Also Making a thing private means it will not be accessible to other classes & there objects. & do you think if a person can see your.h like this he will not be able to see your .cpp?

.h & .cpp are not separate thing. They are finally forming a single entity. During compilation all header contents get merged in .cpp file. & all .cpp finally into a dll or exe or something which machine can understand & run. .h is formed just to make code cleaner.

Make it private in header it will be more cleaner.

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