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I don't know why my code is seg faulting, im assuming im looking at a point in the queue where theres nothing there, but I thought that I do push elements onto the queue.

heres my code:

template <typename T> 
class btree {

  public:
    btree(size_t maxNodeElems);
    ~btree() {}

    struct node {  
      list <T> elements;
      node *lvl;
    };

  private:
    size_t maxNodeElems;
    node*  root;   

};

template <typename T>
btree<T>::btree(size_t maxNodeElems) {
  if (maxNodeElems > 0) max = maxNodeElems;
  root = new node;
  root->lvl = new node*[max+1];
  for (int i = 0; i < (int) max+1; i++) root->lvl[i] = new node;
}

template <typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const btree<T>& tree) {

  queue <typename btree<T>::node*> q;
  q.push(tree.root);
  int loop = 0;
  while (!q.empty()) {
    loop++;
    typename btree<T>::node* temp = q.front();
    int i = 0;

    class list <T>::iterator itr = temp->elements.begin();
    for (; itr != temp->elements.end(); ++itr) {
      os << *itr << " ";
      if (!temp->lvl[i]->elements.empty()) {
        q.push(temp->lvl[i]);
      }
      i++;
    }

    q.pop();
  }

  return os;
}

could someone help me out, im lost because when I check if the if statement is working inside the for loop, it does go into it, but im not sure if its pushing

EDIT: more code

template <typename T>
pair <typename btree<T>::iterator, bool> btree <T>::insert (const T& elem) {
  pair <typename btree<T>::node, bool> start;
  start = addElement (elem, root);
  pair <typename btree<T>::iterator, bool> final;
  return final;
}

template <typename T>
pair <typename btree<T>::node, bool> btree<T>::addElement (const T& e, typename btree<T>::node*& n) {

  pair <typename btree<T>::node, bool> elemPair;

  if (n->elements.size() == max) {  
    int count = 0;
    class list <T>::iterator itr = n->elements.begin();
    for (; itr != n->elements.end(); ++itr) {
      count++; 
      if (e < *itr) {
        count--;
        elemPair = addElement (e, n->lvl[count]);
      } else if (e == *itr) return make_pair (*n, false);
    }

  } else {
    n->elements.push_back(e);
    n->elements.sort();
  }


  return make_pair(*n, true);
}

in my test.cpp:

int main (void) {

  btree<char> b(2);
  b.insert('Z');   b.insert('J');   b.insert('Y');
  cout << b; 
  return 0;
}
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1  
Compile with debug symbols (gcc -g -O0) and run it through valgrind. –  Brendan Long Oct 20 '11 at 4:14
    
@BrendanLong what does that do (im still very new to programming) –  SNpn Oct 20 '11 at 4:15
    
It will tell you where your code is breaking. Those instructions will work on Linux (it will tell you exactly where and why your program is crashing). You can get similar results on other platforms by using your IDE's debugger. –  Brendan Long Oct 20 '11 at 4:16
    
@BrendanLong so just run it as gcc -g -O0 -Wall -Werror -o test test.cpp or something similar? –  SNpn Oct 20 '11 at 4:18
    
Yes, and then run valgrind test (runs Valgrind on the executable named "test"). Presumably any school computers will have it. If it's a home computer, do whatever command installs packages to install it (aptitude install valgrind, yum install valgrind, pacman -S valgrind) –  Brendan Long Oct 20 '11 at 4:19

1 Answer 1

The code you post doesn't compile and so I can't verify your error.

The following does compile and so might provide some help. Its similar to the code you provided.

However, the following is not good code - for example, you need to be vary careful about using the new keyword in a constructor, because exception handing in a constructor is more difficult (and there is the chance of an allocation exception being thrown).

template <typename T> 
class btree {

public:
  btree(size_t maxNodeElems);
  //if your using new then you need to delete - do that in the destructor.
  ~btree();
  struct node {  
    list <T> elements;
      //you use this as a pointer to an array, 
      //  it can be demoted to a double pointer - 
      //  but not a single pointer as you had.
      node ** lvl;
    };

  private:
    size_t maxNodeElems;  //you don't actually use this variable in your code
    node*  root;   
   //You are doing memory allocations in the constructor, 
   //  therefore need to overload operator= and copy constructor. 
   //  Since we are not overloading these, we make them private.
   void operator=(const btree&);
   btree(const btree&);

};


//In your code you had a undeclared variable max. 
// No idea what it was or why you had it - removed.
template <typename T>
btree<T>::btree(size_t v_maxNodeElems) 
  : maxNodeElems(v_maxNodeElems)  // construct the variable you define
{  
  root = new node;
  root->lvl = new node*[maxNodeElems+1];  //root->lvl is a double pointer
  for (int i = 0; i < (int) maxNodeElems+1; i++) 
    root->lvl[i] = new node;
}

//delete in reverse order to you constructing
template <typename T>
btree<T>::~btree() {
  for (int i = 0; i < (int) maxNodeElems+1; i++) 
    delete root->lvl[i];   //first the elements of the array
  delete[] root->lvl;  //then the array - note the delete[]
  delete root;  //then the root.
}

int
main  (int ac, char **av)
{
  btree<char> b(2);
}
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