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I have a number of divs, each of which contain an instance of a number of different items, each with their own unique classes and/or ids.

A lot of .js code applies to the elements within each of these parent divs, and my .js is getting bloated by the constant need to do things like:

// Stuff like this occurs 15-20 times for similar but different actions
$(this).parent().nextAll('.target').eq(0).find('.toggle').slideToggle();
$(this).next('.alert').html('Success');

In the context of the document, I see why this code is necessary. However, I feel that if I were only able to redefine the reference point as being the parent div instead of the whole document, I could replace the convoluted code above with the MUCH easier:

function keepingCodeWithinParentDiv(){
  $('.toggle').slideToggle();
  $('.alert').html('Success');
}

So, is there a way to say in Javascript: for this part nothing exists outside this div?

share|improve this question
    
No. But you could still probably clean up with using a common ancestor and making find() calls based on that. – alex Oct 20 '11 at 6:27
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have a parent element (let's name it element) that you want to confine your jQuery selector operations to, you can just pass it as a context to any jQuery select:

$(".toggle", element).slideToggle();

See jQuery doc for more info.

If you show us your actual HTML and describe what you're trying to get, we could give more specific advice.

share|improve this answer
    
This is called context. $(".toggle", element) is the same as element.find(".toggle") – HerrSerker Oct 20 '11 at 6:30
    
See api.jquery.com/jQuery/#jQuery1 (Selector Context) – HerrSerker Oct 20 '11 at 6:33

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