Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to get the grips of using prototypal inheritance. Here is the code I have below. It is based on the book "Object -Oriented Javascript" by Stoyan Stefanov, with just a few modifications.

Basically I have an Athlete object that extends a Person object. I have created 3 objects. Bob is a Person, while Billy Jean and Steve are Athletes. I added Bob, Billy Jean and Steve in that particular order. I invoked say() and run() functions and getSpeed() and jump(), for the Athlete objects, in all 3 objects in this particular order: Bob, Billy Jean and Steve.

Here is the code below.

<script type="text/javascript">

    function clone(o) {
    var n;
    function F(){};
    F.prototype = o;
    n = new F();

    return n;

   }

    /* Uber is equivalent to the extends method */
   function uber(parent, child) {
     var n = clone(parent);
     n.uber = parent;

   for (var i in child) {
      n[i] = child[i];
   }
   return n;
}

var Person = {
   initialise: function(name)
   {   
      this.name = name;
         },
   say: function()
   {
    console.log('My name is ' + this.name + '. I am a person'); 
   },
   run: function(){
    console.log('I have run 5km');
   },
   jump: function() {
      console.log('I have jumped for joy!');
   }
 };


 var Athlete = {
     initialise: function(name,speed) {
         this.speed = speed; 
         //uber is the parent
    this.uber.initialise(name);
},
    say: function() { console.log('My name is ' + this.name + '. I am an athlete');},
    run: function() { console.log('I have run 20km'); this.jump()},
    getSpeed: function() {console.log('My Speed is: ' + this.speed + 'km Hour');}
  }


  var Athlete = uber(Person, Athlete);

  console.log("Hello, Starting Test...");
  var bob = clone(Person); 
  bob.initialise('Bob');
  bob.say();
  bob.run();

  console.log("Adding Billy Jean...");
  var billyJean = clone(Athlete);
  billyJean.initialise('Billy Jean', 15);

 console.log("Adding Steve...");
 var steve = clone(Athlete);
  steve.initialise('Steve', 25);

 console.log("Asking Billy Jean...");
 billyJean.say();
 billyJean.run();
 billyJean.getSpeed();

 console.log("Asking Steve...");
 steve.say();
 steve.run();
 steve.getSpeed();

</script>

However, when I run the code, although I invoke the functions for Billy Jean first, Steve's properties pop up twice, meaning Steve replaced Billy Jean. Output shown below.

Hello, Starting Test...
My name is Bob. I am a person
I have run 5km
Adding Billy Jean...
Adding Steve...
Asking Billy Jean...
My name is Steve. I am an athlete
I have run 20km
I have jumped for joy!
My Speed is: 15km Hour
Asking Steve Tran...
My name is Steve. I am an athlete
I have run 20km
I have jumped for joy!
My Speed is: 25km Hour

I was just wondering if there is a way to separate Billy Jean and Steve So that I get both their details instead of Steve's details twice?

If it's impossible then what alternative can I use instead to solve this problem? Any solution or help would be a great help.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's your issue. "this.uber" is referencing an object that is shared between steve and billyJean. Objects are passed around by reference, so that's why this is happening. Try replacing

this.uber.initialise(name); 

with

this.uber.initialise.call(this, name); 

(In case you aren't aware, 'call' and 'apply' make 'methods' run in different scopes). I don't have any real background on your experience, so hopefully this next ramble isn't insulting.. but, a few thoughts. I've rarely seen javascript done like this. Most of the time it has been something more along the lines of...

var bob = new Person(); 
bob.initialise('Bob');
bob.say();
bob.run();

Why the 'clone'? Did you want a purist approach? If so, the 'clone' isn't any better - you're still calling 'new' and doing a little magic. A purist approach would be more of.. (pardon the jQuery.. being lazy)

Object.prototype.clone = function () {
  return $.extend(true, {}, this);
};

Object.prototype.improve = function (extras) {
  var spawn = $.extend(true, {}, this, extras);
  spawn.uber = this;
  return spawn;
};

var Person = {
  initialise: function(name) {   
    this.name = name;
  },
  say: function() {
    console.log('My name is ' + this.name + '. I am a person'); 
  },
  run: function(){
    console.log('I have run 5km');
  },
  jump: function() {
console.log('I have jumped for joy!');
  }
};

var Athlete = Person.improve({
  initialise: function(name,speed) {
    this.speed = speed; 
    //uber is the parent
    this.uber.initialise.call(this, name);
  },
  say: function() { console.log('My name is ' + this.name + '. I am an athlete');},
  run: function() { console.log('I have run 20km'); this.jump()},
  getSpeed: function() {console.log('My Speed is: ' + this.speed + 'km Hour');}
});

var bob = Person.clone(); 
bob.initialise('Bob');
bob.say();
bob.run();

console.log("Adding Billy Jean...");
var billyJean = Athlete.clone();
billyJean.initialise('Billy Jean', 15);

console.log("Adding Steve...");
var steve = Athlete.clone();
steve.initialise('Steve', 25);

console.log("Asking Billy Jean...");
billyJean.say();
billyJean.run();
billyJean.getSpeed();

console.log("Asking Steve...");
steve.say();
steve.run();
steve.getSpeed();

This works just as well. Note that I'm still using 'call' here - it's because the original is passed by reference. You could undo that.. make it pass a clone.. but really, it's a waste of memory and cycles 90% of the time.

So, there's my best 'purist' approach! I personally don't like this way, as I see 'steve' and 'billyJean' as 'new' Athletes - not clones of an Athletes object - so I'd be more inclined to use a pattern that lets me do 'steve = new Athlete('Steve');'

My two cents, hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much Stephen for the more detailed explanation and even offering me a recoded version and your opinion and not at all I'm not offended. It was really helpful. I'm just trying to get my head around Javascript and this code that I wrote was based on a book that I found. This was my first post on Stack overflow and like I said in the above response, I have no idea on how to accept both answers. Anyway I've given your answer a tick, but I would've loved to give a vote up on your solution. Anyway thanks again. –  koramaiku Oct 21 '11 at 0:20
    
No problem. It's a lot of fun to get questions like these and try and explain the idea. Javascript is a very interesting language - try and leave whatever other languages you know behind, as JS let's (and sometimes requires) you to do and know things that seem counter intuitive. Good luck and enjoy. –  Stephen Oct 21 '11 at 6:05

This particular line is problematic in your example in Athlete.initialize:

//uber is the parent
this.uber.initialise(name);

With this call, you call initialize on object represented by uber, which is shared among your athlets. Change this to:

this.uber.initialize.call(this, name);

to call initialize from uber on your actual object (this) passing additional paremeters.

share|improve this answer
    
~ That did the trick! Thanks so much for the quick reply, just made the change today and it worked. This is my first time posting on Stack Overflow, had 2 posts with the same solution but i don't know how to vote both of them as correct. Anyway I've given this one a vote up. Thanks again! –  koramaiku Oct 21 '11 at 0:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.