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I'm a novice with no functional programming experience in the past (yet, quite a bit of procedural/imperative programming experience). I'm having a bit of trouble with understanding how declaring your own datatype works.

For instance, say I declared a datatype:

data SomeThing = Int [Int]

how would you write a Haskell function which consumes a someData and produces a someData; only the produced data's Int is the sum of all the elements in the consumed data's [Int], and where the consumed value's [Int] has had every element multiplied by 2 in the produced [Int].

This is obviously possible, but I have not found any answers that made sense to me after a web search.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First of all, you have a mistake in your data type declaration. From your question, you want a data type which contains an Int and a list of Int, but you're missing a data constructor1. This is a label used when pattern matching, or when constructing new values of your data type.

data SomeThing = SomeThingConstr Int [Int]

It's common to name the constructor the same thing as the data type itself when there's only one, but I've given them separate names here to avoid confusion.

Now it's easy to write your function using pattern matching and this data constructor.

foo :: SomeThing -> SomeThing
foo (SomeThingConstr _ xs) = SomeThingConstr (sum xs) (map (*2) xs)

1Or rather, you have a data constructor called Int, which is obviously not what you meant.

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There is no error. The data constructor is called Int. –  Frerich Raabe Oct 20 '11 at 7:51
    
@FrerichRaabe: Not a compile error, no, but it's clearly not what the OP wanted. –  hammar Oct 20 '11 at 7:52
1  
@FrerichRaabe The OP refers to the output data as having separate Int and [Int] fields. –  dave4420 Oct 20 '11 at 7:53
    
@dave4420: Ah, true. I misread the question (which kind of invalidates my own response, oops). Thanks for clarifying this. –  Frerich Raabe Oct 20 '11 at 7:55

(Quoting from your post as I suspect it will get edited.)

For instance, say I declared a datatype:

data SomeThing = Int [Int]

how would you write a Haskell function which consumes a someData and produces a someData; only the produced data's Int is the sum of all the elements in the consumed data's [Int], and where the consumed value's [Int] has had every element multiplied by 2 in the produced [Int].

I presume you mean the data type to be

data SomeData = SomeData Int [Int]

Then you want

f :: SomeData -> SomeData
f (SomeData _ ys) = SomeData (sum ys) (map (2 *) ys)
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