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I have a list of dict. Need to convert it to list of namedtuple(preferred) or simple tuple while to split first variable by whitespace.

What is more pythonic way to do it?

I simplified my code a little. Comprehensions, gen expressions and itertools usage welcomed.

Data-in:

dl = [{'a': '1 2 3',
       'd': '*',
       'n': 'first'},
      {'a': '4 5',
       'd': '*', 'n':
       'second'},
      {'a': '6',
       'd': '*',
       'n': 'third'},
      {'a': '7 8 9 10',
       'd': '*',
       'n': 'forth'}]

Simple algorithm:

from collections import namedtuple

some = namedtuple('some', ['a', 'd', 'n'])

items = []
for m in dl:
    a, d, n = m.values()
    a = a.split()
    items.append(some(a, d, n))

Output:

[some(a=['1', '2', '3'], d='*', n='first'),
 some(a=['4', '5'], d='*', n='second'),
 some(a=['6'], d='*', n='third'),
 some(a=['7', '8', '9', '10'], d='*', n='forth')]
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Below, @Petr Viktorin points out the problem with my original answer and your initial solution:

WARNING! The values() of a dictionary are not in any particular order! If this solution works, and a, d, n are really returned in that order, it's just a coincidence. If you use a different version of Python or create the dicts in a different way, it might break.

(I'm kind of mortified I didn't pick this up in the first place, and got 45 rep for it!)

Use @eryksun's suggestion instead:

items =  [some(m['a'].split(), m['d'], m['n']) for m in dl]

My original, incorrect answer. Don't use it unless you have a list of OrderedDict.

items =  [some(a.split(), d, n) for a,d,n in (m.values() for m in dl)]
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thanx, that's what i need –  scraplesh Oct 20 '11 at 7:48
1  
WARNING! The values() of a dictionary are not in any particular order! If this solution works, and a, d, n are really returned in that order, it's just a coincidence. If you use a different version of Python or create the dicts in a different way, it might break. Use the keys directly, as in @eryksun's comment. –  Petr Viktorin Oct 20 '11 at 10:11
    
@klesh - please see edits, or this'll come back to bite you! –  detly Oct 21 '11 at 0:33
    
@PetrViktorin - wow, I can't believe I missed that. Thanks for the correction! –  detly Oct 21 '11 at 0:34
    
@PetrViktorin how can i forget that... will use OrderedDict instead –  scraplesh Oct 21 '11 at 5:33

Another option, not sure whether it's better or worse than the others:

class some(namedtuple('some', 'a d n')):
    def __new__(cls, **args):
        args['a'] = args['a'].split()
        return super(some, cls).__new__(cls, **args)

items = list(some(**m) for m in dl)

BTW, I'm not absolutely committed to giving the base class the same name as the subclass some. I like it because it means that the resulting class converts to string using the name some, and it's never particularly caused me problems, but potentially it could be confusing if you're debugging with class names. So do it with care.

Or the same idea using different tricks:

some = namedtuple('some', 'a d n')

def make_some(args):
    args = args.copy()
    args['a'] = args['a'].split()
    return some(**args)

items = map(make_some, dl) # NB: this doesn't return a list in Python 3
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In addition the answer provided by @detly, if you don't know about the fields of the dicts before hand, you can construct a namedtuple class with

some = namedtuple('some', set(k for k in d.keys() for d in dl))
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Thought I'd chime in here just because I love namedtuples and dictionaries so much!

Here's a list comprehension with a dict comprehension in it, that can do your initial processing of the dictionary:

split_dictionaries = \ 
    [{key: value.split() for k, value in d.iteritems()} for d in dl] 

I frequently use a recipe that I call "tupperware" that recursively converts dictionaries to namedtuples. See the gist here, for the code. Here's a simplified piece of it, to integrate here, and have a pretty clean way of doing this operation.

import collections

def namedtuple_from_mapping(mapping, name="Tupperware"):
    this_namedtuple_maker = collections.namedtuple(name, mapping.iterkeys())
    return this_namedtuple_maker(**mapping)

So given that function, you can do this - which we'll refactor shortly:

split_namedtuples = [ 
    namedtuple_from_mapping(
        {key: value.split() for k, value in d.iteritems()}
    ) for d in dl
]   

And now with better encapsulation and readability:

def format_string(string):
    return string.split()

def format_dict(d):
    return {key: format_string(value) for key, value in d.iteritems()}

formatted_namedtuples = [namedtuple_from_mapping(format_dict(d)) for d in dl]
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