Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

my code is like below

class Something(models.Model)

    def exception(self)
    try:
       Something.objects.all()
    except Exception():
       raise Exception()

called this method from testcases ,its working but i need to raise exception ,it does not catch the exception and here is my test case

def test_exception(self):
    instance = Something()
    instance.exception()

its working fine but i need to raise exception from except block

share|improve this question
2  
It is very unclear what you are trying to do. Why are you raising an exception from your catch-block? Also, there are numerous syntax-errors in your example (e.g. missing : and bad indentation on exception). –  Björn Pollex Oct 20 '11 at 8:10
    
If you using the python unittest framework you probably wanna use the assertRaises(exception) method. –  Nicoretti Oct 20 '11 at 8:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
def exception(self)
    try:
        Something.objects.all()
    except Exception, err:
        #print err.message (if you want)
        raise err

This will catch the error and print the exact msg if required.

share|improve this answer
1  
I believe you meant raise err. You cannot raise err.message which is a string. –  Xion Oct 20 '11 at 9:29
    
yes it should be 'raise err', thanks for noticing :) –  avasal Oct 20 '11 at 13:08

This line:

except Exception():

should be:

except Exception:
share|improve this answer
2  
Yes, but of course it shouldn't be, as it's an extremely bad idea to just catch Exception - you should catch the actual exceptions you handle, and leave the others to bubble up. –  Daniel Roseman Oct 20 '11 at 8:49
    
May I know the reason of the downvote? My reply is technically correct and answers exactly the OP question, so I see no justifiable reason for a downvote, see StackOverflow's FAQ. If you want to advise the OP about good Python programming practices, comment the question. –  Nicola Musatti Oct 20 '11 at 10:13

Why catch the Exception just to re-raise it? If you are not doing anything in the except suite except re-raising the exception, then simply do not catch the exception in the first place:

@staticmethod
def exception():
    Something.objects.all()

If you are doing something nontrivial inside the except suite, then:

def exception(self):
    try:
        Something.objects.all()
    except Exception:
        # do something (with self?)
        raise 

Then, to test that the exception method raises an Exception:

def test_exception(self):
    instance = Something()
    self.assertRaises(Exception, instance.exception)

This depends on Something.objects.all() raising Exception.


PS. If exception does not depend on self, then it is best to remove it from the argument list and make exception a staticmethod.

PPS. Exception is a very broad base exception class. A more specific exception would be more helpful for debugging, and allow other code to catch this specific exception instead of forcing it to handle any possible Exception.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.