Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have several types that share common behaviour and with same constructors and operators. Some look like this:

class NumberOfFingers
{
public:
    void operator=(int t) { this->value = t; }
    operator int() const { return this->value; }
private:
    int value;
};

NumberOfToes is identical.

Each class has different behaviour, here is an example:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &s, const NumberOfFingers &fingers)
{
    s << fingers << " fingers\n";
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &s, const NumberOfFingers &toes)
{
    s << toes << " toes\n";
}

How can I minimise the duplication in the class definitions, whilst keeping class types distinct? I don't want to have NumberOfFingers and NumberOfToes derive from a common base class because I lose the constructor and operators. I would guess a good answer would involve templates.

share|improve this question
3  
What makes you think that inheritance from a common base would make you lose the constructors and operators? –  Björn Pollex Oct 20 '11 at 8:53
    
@Björn What are you saying? Can a derived class always use base class constructors and operators, if it doesn't have its own? –  paperjam Oct 20 '11 at 9:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, you are correct in that it would involve templates :)

enum {FINGERS, TOES...};
...
template<unsigned Type> //maybe template<enum Type> but I havent compiled this.
class NumberOfType
{
public:
    void operator=(int t) { this->value = t; }
    operator int() const { return this->value; }
private:
    int value;
};
...
typedef NumberOfType<FINGERS> NumberOfFinger
typedef NumberOfType<TOES> NumberOfToes
... so on and so forth.
share|improve this answer
3  
it might be better to use types instead of enumeration, e.g. 'struct fingers_tag', 'typedef NumberOfType<fingers_tag> NumberOfFinger' and so on. This way you don't need to have a single place specifying all possible type variations. –  Konstantin Oznobihin Oct 20 '11 at 9:32
    
@Konstantin Thats very true indeed, depends on whether we want the set of such types to be closed or open. But that certainly is the way to go if we want to keep the set open. –  Akanksh Oct 20 '11 at 9:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.