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I'm pretty sure that this question has already been asked. But even after searching for some minutes, I didn't find any post which could answer my question. I have the following C++-class:

// Header-File
class A
{
    public:
    A();

    private:
    B m_B;
    C m_C;
};

// cpp-File
A::A()
: m_B(1)
{
    m_B.doSomething();
    m_B.doMore();
    m_C = C(m_B.getSomeValue());
}

I now would like to avoid the class A to call any constructor of C m_C. Because on the last line in A::A(), I'm anyways going to initialize m_C myself because I need to prepare m_B first. I could provide an empty default constructor for class B. But that's not the idea.

I have already tried to add m_C(NULL) to the init-list of A::A(). Sometimes it worked, sometimes it said there was no constructor taking NULL as an argument.

So how can I have m_C left uninitialized? I know that with pointers, the m_C(NULL)-way works. And I don't want to allocate it dynamically using new.

Any idea is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
An evil way is to have a "char m_C_data[sizeof(C)]" as a member, and then do a placment new into it when initializing. This will avoid heap allocation, but you will have to cast it to the right type everytime you use it. Of course the complexity of type C has to be kept in mind (is a POD, has vftable, <more things I don't know about>..etc.) –  Akanksh Oct 20 '11 at 9:41
    
Does class C have a default constructor, which does nothing ? Else write one more constructor, which takes NULL as an arguement and make it explicit to be safe and does nothing. –  DumbCoder Oct 20 '11 at 9:43
    
Until now, it doesn't. And even though I didn't want it to have a default constructor, it looks like I just have to change it to have one. –  Atmocreations Oct 20 '11 at 9:55

10 Answers 10

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you ask is forbidden - and correctly so. This ensures that every member is correctly initialized. Do not try to work around it - try to structure your classes that they work with it.

Idea:

  • C has a constructor that does nothing
  • C has an initialization method that makes the class usable
  • C tracks whether it has been initialized correctly or not and returns appropriate errors if used without initialization.
share|improve this answer
1  
Well... I partially disagree. In the constructor, I'm ensuring that every member is correctly initialized, too. If you have a pointer, it isn't initialized "correctly" either. But it looks like I gotta take another way. Thank you! –  Atmocreations Oct 20 '11 at 9:51
    
Okay. I think the only solution is to create an empty default-constructor. The rest of the solutions seem to be nice, but not fitting for my current problem. Thanks! –  Atmocreations Oct 20 '11 at 9:58
    
@Atmocreations: the pointer itself is initialized correctly - according to the pointers "default constructor". It is normally not meaningful - if you are lucky it's 0. –  Tobias Langner Oct 20 '11 at 11:49

I don't see a good way to achieve what you want. This must be a workaround:

// Header-File
class A
{
    public:
    A();

    private:
    B m_B;
    C m_C;
    static int prepareC(B& b);
};

// cpp-File
A::A()
: m_B(1)
, m_C(prepareC(m_B))
{
}

int A::prepareC(B& b)
{
    b.doSomething();
    b.doMore();
    return b.getSomeValue();
}

Please ensure that m_B.doSomething(), m_B.doMore() and m_B.getSomeValue() don't touch m_C (directly or indirectly).


As @Tobias correctly mentions, this solution depends on the order of initialization. You need to ensure that the definitions of m_B and m_C are in this order.


Updated the code according to @Loki's idea.

share|improve this answer
1  
you must be aware that the behavior of this depends on the correct order of the definitions of m_B and m_C. It works as long as m_C is defined after m_B. Please comment as such. Otherwise I like this version. –  Tobias Langner Oct 20 '11 at 9:43
3  
+1: Though I would make prepareC() a static member and pass b as a parameter. –  Loki Astari Oct 20 '11 at 9:44
    
@Tobias: thanks you, I've updated the answer. –  Vlad Oct 20 '11 at 9:47
    
@Loki: you are right, your idea is cleaner. –  Vlad Oct 20 '11 at 9:48
    
Looks like a possibility to me. Why do I have to ensure that m_B's methods don't touch m_C? –  Atmocreations Oct 20 '11 at 9:52

You can't.

All member variables are full constructed when the construcotr code block is entered. This means there constructors must be called.

But you can work around this restriction.

// Header-File
class A
{
    struct Initer
    {
         Initer(B& b)
             : m_b(b)
         {
             m_b.doSomething();
             m_b.doMore();
         }
         operator int()  // assuming getSomeValue() returns int.
         {
             return m_b.getSomeValue();
         }
         B& m_b;
    };
    public:
    A();

    private:   // order important.
    B m_B;
    C m_C;
};


// cpp-File
A::A()
: m_B(1)
, m_C(Initer(m_B))
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you do something similar with a static Init method? E.g. m_B(1), m_C(Init(m_B)). I wanted to put that in my answer, but I wasn't sure if it was legal or not. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 20 '11 at 9:46
    
@merlyn-morgan-graham: Yes. You need to define a conversion operator that will convert an object of type Init into a type T (where T is the same as the result type as getSomeValue()). –  Loki Astari Oct 20 '11 at 9:49
    
I meant to define Init as: private: static int Init(B& b) { /* init here */ return b.getSomeValue(); }. It seems your comment on the other answer might confirm that this works. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 20 '11 at 9:51
    
@Merlyn Morgan-Graham: Yes using a private static method is cleaner than this. I would go with Vlad's idea now that I have seen it. –  Loki Astari Oct 20 '11 at 9:55
    
@LokiAstari: Thank you! I like this solution. Although I find it easier to just create an empty constructor for C. –  Atmocreations Oct 20 '11 at 9:59

Easiest is storing pointers to a B and a C. These can be initialized to 0, omitting any construction. Be careful not to dereference a null pointer and delete it in the destructor of A (or use std::unique_ptr/boost::scoped_ptr).

But why not initialize m_B first (through a proper constructor call, not in A::A(), and then use that initialized B instance to initialize m_C? It will call for a small rewrite, but I bet it'll be worth the code cleanup.

share|improve this answer

Tricky, but can be done.

What you need is a way to adding behavior to the member variable. So the variable is initialized or maybe not. Let's call it "Maybe"

If you do it in a generic way, you want a template class to encapsulate that behavior and apply it to any type:

template<class T>
Maybe {
  public:
    Maybe() : m_has(false) {}

    // If we want to start with the value, call the constructor
    Maybe(const T& v) : m_has(true) { new (m_value) T(v); }

    // If we have some value, make sure to call the destructor
    ˜Maybe() { if (m_has) reinterpret_cast<T*>(m_value)->˜T(); }

    // Add the value latter on          
    void setValue(const T& v) {
        if (m_has) {
            reinterpret_cast<T>(*m_value) = v;
        } else {
            m_has = true;
            new (m_value) T(v);
        }
    }

    bool hasValue() const { return m_has; }
    const T& value() const { return reinterpret_cast<T&>(*m_value); }
    T& value() { return reinterpret_cast<T&>(m_value); }

  private:
    bool m_has;
    // Reserve the memory for the object, but dont initialize it - dont call it T
    uint8_t m_value[sizeof(T)];
};

I wrote the code out the top of my head, so there might be some typos or small details to be adjusted. I know it works though.

Now, just call your member as Maybe and then you don't have to create the empty constructor.

share|improve this answer

The pointer sounds like the only clean solution to me. The only other solution I see is to have a default constructor for C that does nothing and have an initialising method in C you call yourself later.

m_C.Initialise( m_B.getSomeValue() );

share|improve this answer

If you don't want to allocate it dynamically using new for code clutter/exception safety reasons, you can use a std::unique_ptr or std::auto_ptr to solve this problem.

A solution that avoids new is to edit C to have a two-step initialization process. The constructor would then construct a "zombie" object, and you'd have to call an Initialize method on that m_C instance to finish your initialization. This is similar to the existing cases you found where you could pass NULL to the constructor, and later go back to initialize the object.

Edit:

I thought of this earlier (even though it looks much like other people's solutions). But I had to get some confirmation that this wouldn't break before I added this solution - C++ can be quite tricky, and I don't use it very often :)

This is cleaner than my other suggestions, and doesn't require you to mess with any implementation but that of A.

Simply use a static method as the middle-man on your initialization:

class A
{
public:
    A();

private:
    static int InitFromB(B& b)
    {
        b.doSomething();
        b.doMore();
        return b.getSomeValue();
    }

    // m_B must be initialized before m_C
    B m_B;
    C m_C;
};

A::A()
    : m_B(1)
    , m_C(InitFromB(m_B))
{
}

Note that this means you can't allow m_B to depend on the instance of A or C at all, whereas the solutions at the top of this answer might allow you to pass A or m_C into m_B's methods.

share|improve this answer

Just use comma expressions:

A::A()
  : m_B(1)
  , m_c(m_B.doSomething(), m_B.doMore(), m_B.getSomeValue())
{
}

Obviously, as others have explained, m_B better be declared before m_C else m_B.doSomething() invokes undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
1  
Assuming C does not have a 3 parameter constructor. –  Loki Astari Oct 20 '11 at 11:06
    
In which case you add parantheses: :m_c((foo(), bar(), baz())) –  MSalters Oct 20 '11 at 11:19
    
thanks for your respone. the idea is nice and works well for few instructions. but considering the number of instructions i need to do before being able to instanciate m_C, thifs looks just plain ugly to me. –  Atmocreations Oct 20 '11 at 15:11

How about using technique described in this QA?

Prevent calls to default constructor for an array inside class

std::aligned_storage<sizeof(T[n]), alignof(T)>::type

Or, you also can consider using of union. AFAIK, unions will be initialized only with first named member's constructor.

For example,

union
{
   uint8_t _nothing = 0; 
   C c;
};

According to the standard mentioned in the QA, c will be zero-initialized, and its constructor will not be called.

share|improve this answer

Here we have the building blocks:

#include <iostream>

class C
{
public:
  C(int i){std::cout << "C::C(" << i << ")" << std::endl;}
};

class B
{
public:
  B(int i){std::cout << "B::B(" << i << ")" << std::endl;}
  void doSomething(){std::cout << "B::doSomething()" << std::endl;}
  void doMore(){std::cout << "B::doMore()" << std::endl;}
  int getSomeValue(){return 42;}
};

If you want to make a new kind of construction for B consider making a derived class:

class B1 : public B
{
public:
  B1() : B(1)
  {
    doSomething();
    doMore();
  }
};

Now use the class B1 that is derived from B:

class A
{
private:
  B1 _b;
  C _c;
public:
  A() : _c(_b.getSomeValue()){std::cout << "A::A()" << std::endl;}
};

And then:

int main()
{
  A a;
}

Output:

B::B(1)
B::doSomething()
B::doMore()
C::C(42)
A::A()
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