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I am a newbie to google app engine stuff. I am reading about app engine from yesterday. I have a doubt regarding the write transaction during request time out.

Suppose that I am creating 10,000 objects and trying it to save through a single transaction (assuming that DatastoreService is like a Hibernate Transaction) like this

    String greeting = "test";
    String guestBookName = "default";
    DatastoreService datastoreService = DatastoreServiceFactory.getDatastoreService();
    Key guestBookKey = KeyFactory.createKey("GuestBook", guestBookName);
    for(int i=0;i<10000;i++)
    {
        Entity entity = new Entity("Greeting", guestBookKey);
        entity.setProperty("date", new Date());
        entity.setProperty("greeting", greeting);
        datastoreService.put(entity);
    }

Suppose that after saving 1000 objects, it the request timed out will 1000 objects be deleted?

I have run this code on app engine, after saving 1164 objects to the datastore the request timed out. I got this error

....Uncaught exception from servlet
com.google.apphosting.api.DeadlineExceededException: This request (0000000000000000)
started at 2011/10/20 07:18:36.726 UTC and was still executing at 2011/10/20 07:19:36.143 UTC.....

The objects were not removed from the datastore. Besides I read here that

The datastore can execute multiple operations in a single transaction. By definition, a transaction cannot succeed unless every operation in the transaction succeeds. If any of the operations fail, the transaction is automatically rolled back. This is especially useful for distributed web applications, where multiple users may be accessing or manipulating the same data at the same time.

Can anyone please help me understand about this clearly.

Thank you all in advance.

share|improve this question
    
after reading various posts on the web I think I found the answer to my question. I am thinking to do the following Write a catch block, whenever the time is out, record the value of "i" and again send a redirect to the same request sending the "i" as a parameter. Now if the parameter exists in the url, the value of "i" is taken and rest of the objects are saved. Is the approach right? – Krishna Chaitanya Oct 20 '11 at 12:16
    
A better approach would be to do this in the task queue, not a user facing request. Also, putting all your entities in a single entity group will impose strict limitations on the update rate you can support. – Nick Johnson Oct 25 '11 at 3:56
    
Thank you @NickJohnson. Can you please send me an appropriate link where I can get more details? – Krishna Chaitanya Oct 25 '11 at 5:31
    
up vote 1 down vote accepted

GAE transactions are working only against Entity Group (elements who have same root/parent). And second - it's using optimistic locking, that means that transaction fails when other tread has made changes before current.

It's not traditional transactions. Your object will not be deleted if transaction your code fails

Please read http://code.google.com/intl/en/appengine/docs/java/datastore/overview.html#Transactions_and_Entity_Groups

share|improve this answer
    
Hi splix, I could not understand your reply, can you please elaborate it. Thanks – Krishna Chaitanya Oct 20 '11 at 12:18

I now understood how to handle the writes in to the datastore. Using this code I was able to rollback the objects saved if the request timed out. First I tried this code with no Thread.sleep(int) and with i<10000. The request failed and when I went to my Datastore viewer I could not see any new records. Then I used the Thread.sleep(int) with i<4 and sent a request. This time I could see the records in my datastore viewer.

I now understood a bit about Transaction and datastore. Thank you @splix

package guestbook;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

import javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;

import com.google.appengine.api.datastore.DatastoreService;
import com.google.appengine.api.datastore.DatastoreServiceFactory;
import com.google.appengine.api.datastore.Entity;
import com.google.appengine.api.datastore.Key;
import com.google.appengine.api.datastore.KeyFactory;
import com.google.appengine.api.datastore.Transaction;
import com.google.appengine.api.users.User;
import com.google.appengine.api.users.UserService;
import com.google.appengine.api.users.UserServiceFactory;
import com.google.apphosting.api.DeadlineExceededException;

@SuppressWarnings("serial")
public class Test extends HttpServlet
{
    public void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws IOException
    {
        Transaction transaction=null;
        try
        {
            String greeting = "test";
            String guestBookName = "default";
            UserService userService = UserServiceFactory.getUserService();
            User user = userService.getCurrentUser();
            DatastoreService datastoreService = DatastoreServiceFactory.getDatastoreService();
            transaction = datastoreService.beginTransaction();
            Key guestBookKey = KeyFactory.createKey("GuestBook", guestBookName);
            for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
            {
                Entity entity = new Entity("Greeting", guestBookKey);
                entity.setProperty("user", user);
                entity.setProperty("date", new Date());
                entity.setProperty("greeting", greeting+" "+i);
                datastoreService.put(entity);
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000*2);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
            transaction.commit();
        }catch(DeadlineExceededException e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        finally
        {
            Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(Test.class.getName());
            logger.info(""+transaction.isActive());
            if(transaction!=null)
                if(transaction.isActive())
                    transaction.rollback();
            logger.info(""+transaction.isActive());
        }
    }
}
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