Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

for example:

first step:bind UnhandledException event.

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += new UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(CurrentDomain_UnhandledException);

second step:

try
    {
       //at here,do asynchronous operation and throw a exception.
    }
catch (Exception ex)
   {
            Console.WriteLine("error");
   }

when the asynchronous operation throw a exception,the catch code it not called,just only the UnhandledException event is triggered,after end event called then exit application.

i want capture exception anything in catch statement and avoid exit application.

=======================================================

the asynchronous code is the asynchronous socket operation.in the socket asynchronous receive message event(BeginReceive,EndReceive),i throw a OverFlowException.

throw new OverflowException("chunk size too long.");

=============================================

you are right,now i capture the exception in asynchronous operation and passed it to original class(this means exception will throw on the same thread,that can try...catcy statement can was called)

share|improve this question
    
How do you start your asynchronous operation? You should refer to the documentation on whatever tool you use for making the operation asynchronous. Some of them may forward the exception to the caller thread, some of them may not and rely on the operation to catch everything, some (e.g.: the new async/await way) may even swallow the exception. –  Vlad Oct 20 '11 at 10:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An asynchronous task by default will operate in a different context from the one it was instantiated in. The try/catch block is therefore not effective in this case.

Think about it in the following way.

Worker worker = new HouseMaid();
try
{
    worker.DoSomeWork();
}
catch(WorkerIsSickException ex)
{
    worker.TakeMedicin();
    worker.StopWorkingAndRestForAWhile();
}

Here we see that when the worker gets sick, the work process breaks and the exception will be handeled. However, when we do:

Worker worker = new HouseMaid();
try
{
    Worker otherWorker = new HouseMaidHelper();

    worker.DelegateWorkTo(otherWorker, CallBackWhenOTherWorkerIsDone);

    worker.GoOnDoSomethingElse();
}
catch(WorkerIsSickException ex)
{
    worker.TakeMedicin();
    worker.StopWorkingAndRestForAWhile();
}

The work try/catch block (or safety net if you will), will only apply for the worker, not otherWorker. The otherWorker has its own scope to work in. If the other worker fails, that shouldnt mean that the worker has to take the medicine.

share|improve this answer
    
More to the point, in the general situation, the person who performed the DelegateWorkTo may already have completed GoOnDoSomethingElse and completely exited the catch block before the HouseMadeHelper has encountered any problem. In many patterns, if one calls a WaitForHelperToFinish method and the helper either has already thrown an exception or ends up throwing one before finishing, the WaitForHelperToFinish method will indicate that, typically by throwing an exception which wraps the helper's exception. –  supercat Oct 20 '11 at 15:58

Your question isn't clear, but if it's the asynchronous operation which throws the exception, then the code you've shown could easily have completed before the exception is thrown anyway - it's all asynchronous, right?

Basically asynchrony makes you rethink error handling - and quite how you do it depends on your asynchrony approach. You'd often catch the exception in the callback - or not even catch it, but check for it with something like Task.Status.

Admittedly all the work in C# 5 for async stuff should make some of this easier, but you still need to think about the asynchrony.

share|improve this answer

The asynchronous operation will get started successfully, hence execution will continue successfully and miss your exception handler. If you want to catch the exception within the asynchronous operation, you will need exception handling in the code that is executing asynchronously. You could then put a call back to a function in your original class if you want to handle the exception there.

share|improve this answer
    
ok,my ideally that the asynchronous operation throw exception and the original class can capture it by try...catcy statement.I just don't want to exception handing in asynchronous operation. –  springchun Oct 20 '11 at 10:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.