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In an application I'm developing, I have a main form that simply sits there and displays log data, and a worker thread that autonomously does the work in a loop.

MyWorker worker = new MyWorker();
MainForm mainForm = new MainForm();

// Subscribe form to log event so log data gets displayed
worker.Log += mainForm.Log;

// Start the worker thread's MainLoop
new Thread(new ThreadStart(worker.MainLoop)).Start();

// Show the form (blocking)
Application.Run(mainForm);

// If we end up here, the form has been closed and the worker has to stop running            
worker.Running = false;

As you can see, whenever the form is closed, the worker thread should be stopped. The worker looks like this:

public class MyWorker
{
    public String Running { get; set; }

    public MyWorker()
    {
        Running = true;
    }

    public void MainLoop()
    {

        while (Running)
        {

            DoExtensiveWork1();
            if (!Running) return;

            DoExtensiveWork2();
            if (!Running) return;

            DoExtensiveWork3();
            if (!Running) return;

            DoExtensiveWork4();
            if (!Running) return;

            DoExtensiveWork5();         
            if (!Running) return;

            // We have to wait fifteen minutes (900 seconds) 
            // before another "run" can be processed
            for (int i = 0; i < 900; i++)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
                if (!Running) return;
            }
        }
    }
}

As you can see, I want the thread to be able to stop when switching between successive work operations, but not when within an operation. When an operation (DoExtensiveWorkN) has finished, its status and results are persisted do disk or database, so quitting while an operation is in progress (by, for example, Thread.Abort) is not an option.

However, I find this code I've just written repulsive to look at, especially the "wait loop" which sleeps for one second 900 times, to prevent the thread from idling for 15 minutes before detecting Running has been set to false.

I'd rather be able to throw some kind of event to stop the main loop as soon as it's finished a piece of work.

Can anyone point me in the right direction how to do this, or if a total rewrite is required because I totally misunderstood threading, show me somewhere where those principles are explained?

share|improve this question
    
Oh, and DoExtensiveWorkN aren't the real method names. :-) –  CodeCaster Oct 20 '11 at 10:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can tidy up both the running of the individual tasks and the 15 min wait loop considerably.

I'd suggest perhaps using something like this:

public class MyWorker
{
    private readonly ManualResetEvent _stopEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    private readonly Action[] _workUnits;

    private bool Running
    {
        get { return !_stopEvent.WaitOne(0); }
    }

    public MyWorker()
    {
        _workUnits = new Action[]
        {
            DoExtensiveWork1,
            DoExtensiveWork2,
            DoExtensiveWork3,
            DoExtensiveWork4,
            DoExtensiveWork5
        };
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        _stopEvent.Set();
    }

    public void MainLoop()
    {

        while (Running)
        {
            foreach (var workUnit in _workUnits)
            {
                workUnit();
                if (!Running) return;
            }           

            // We have to wait fifteen minutes (900 seconds) 
            // before another "run" can be processed
            if (_stopEvent.WaitOne(900000)) return;
        }
    }
}

Then to stop the process at the next appropriate point:

Worker.Stop();
share|improve this answer
    
Works perfectly, thanks. :-) –  CodeCaster Oct 20 '11 at 11:45

Look at Thread.Interrupt ( http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.thread.interrupt(v=VS.100).aspx )

If this thread is not currently blocked in a wait, sleep, or join state, it will be interrupted when it next begins to block. ThreadInterruptedException is thrown in the interrupted thread, but not until the thread blocks. If the thread never blocks, the exception is never thrown, and thus the thread might complete without ever being interrupted.

As long as you keep your loop there, and your long running methods are doing some IO and waiting for that, you should be fine. Else you are forced to rely on doing manual state checking all the time (although you can make it look a little bit prettier by having a general method which takes an action and does the check for you).

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Won't the ThreadInterruptedException be thrown, regardless of the current state of the worker? So if it's halfway executing a DoExtensiveWorkN, that call won't finish? –  CodeCaster Oct 20 '11 at 10:52

I would suggest using System.Timers.Timer.

You can do your work with the running thing and rather than using the sleep you can just set the timer to go off again in 15 minutes.

If you want to stop it early then call some kind of abort method (similar to setting your Running=true variable) that will stop the timer.

It should be noted that each time the timer event fires it will start up a new thread so you dont' need to worry about killing background threads. Your thread finishes its run of processing, sets the timer to run in 15 minutes and then the thread finishes naturally. If you abort during a wait then you just get rid of the timer and no more cleanup needed. If you abort during a run then you let the run finish and at the end it checks a flag and doesn't start the timer again and then the thread finishes.

For the timer you'll want to set the timer to start manually at the end of the process. The alternative is to have the timer ticking every 15 minutes but that would mean that if your processing took 10 minutes then it owuld only be 5 minutes before the next run. And if it took more than 15 minutes you may be in trouble. Also restarting the timer manually guarantees that the processing shouldn't restart while another is running.

share|improve this answer
    
Timers won't solve the main problem I'm having: I don't want the work to continue when the form is closed, and I don't want to add a lot of code to keep checking for that. –  CodeCaster Oct 20 '11 at 10:49
    
@CodeCaster: Ah, I misunderstood "so quitting while an operation is in progress (by, for example, Thread.Abort) is not an option" to meant the entire thread. My thought then would be using an array of Actions but Iridium beat me to it. I still prefer the timer for the 15 minute wait though. :) –  Chris Oct 20 '11 at 11:04
    
I could've described that more clearly. Thanks for the suggestion though. :-) –  CodeCaster Oct 20 '11 at 11:51

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