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Normally, if I have a nullable type for an optional parameter, I would put null as the default value. This way I know that if the value is null, the caller doesn't want to specify any value for that one.

public void Foo(string text, string text2= null);

If the parameter is normally a positive integer, I can use a negative number

public void Foo(string text, int index=-1);

How about DateTime? It is not nullable, and (as far as I know) it doesn't have a meaningless number that cannot be a true input either (like -1 for positive integer). Or is there? What would you use in this situation?

I also know that I can use the nullable DateTime type, but this means that the method caller will have to use Nullable as well as opposed to just conveniently pass a DateTime.

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10 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can make value types nullable using the ? operator in C#:

DateTime? myDate = null;

From this, you can make the parameter optional:

void Foo(DateTime? myDate = null)
{
}

Further reading on Nullable Types.

This is not the only way to skin the cat however, you can use default(DateTime), however you cannot use DateTime.MinValue, MaxValue, or Now in optional parameters because they are not compile time constants.

Of course, you don't need to use optional parameters, you can use overloaded methods if you wish to make use of Min, Max, or Now.

void Foo()
{
    Foo(DateTime.MinValue);
}

void Foo(DateTime d)
{
}

If you want to go overkill (well, maybe not overkill, plenty of valid reasons to do this), then you could define a new date type that understands when it has a value:

class SmarterDateTime
{
    public bool IsSet { get; set; }

    // Wrapper around DateTime etc excluded.
}

As for what should be the default, you can choose to make any date represent a default if you wish, but for things like optional parameters you'll have limitations.

Personally, I tend to use DateTime.MinValue.

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I know, but this is a bit undesirable, because the caller code will have to call it with a nullable as well –  Louis Rhys Oct 20 '11 at 10:21
    
@LouisRhys: Not explicitly they won't - there's an implicit conversion from DateTime to DateTime?. –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '11 at 10:22
    
@JonSkeet @adam is there? But still, I remember that sometimes I encounter situations where I expect the code would work with a DateTime but doesn't work with a DateTime? (not sure what the code was, though) –  Louis Rhys Oct 20 '11 at 10:26
    
@LouisRhys: That would be the case with a ref parameter, or if you're fetching a DateTime? value and trying to assign it to a DateTime variable. –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '11 at 10:29
    
@JonSkeet Does that mean that if it's just a non-ref parameter the caller won't be affected at all? –  Louis Rhys Oct 20 '11 at 10:32
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default (DateTime) - operator default is intended for It

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1  
what is the actual value of it? –  Louis Rhys Oct 20 '11 at 10:22
2  
For anyone else wondering, the actual value is: 1-1-0001 0:00:00 –  natli Dec 16 '12 at 18:11
    
It is equivalent to DateTime.MinValue (Midnight on the first day of the first month in the first year). –  Kjartan Apr 9 '13 at 7:01
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DateTime.MinValue will be the default value.

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At the question "what can be a default value for a DateTime" the response must be: you can only use default(DateTime). This because the default value must be const and both DateTime.MinValue and DateTime.MaxValue are only static readonly, but note that

default(DateTime) == DateTime.MinValue

down to the Kind.

If you want you can implement an overload with one less parameter (the DateTime) and from that overload call the "main" method passing the value you prefer.

But as written by others, the problem is that you wrote wrong premises.

No, DateTime (as nearly all the ValueTypes. Nearly all because Nullable<Nullable<int>> is illegal, even while Nullable<T> is a ValueType) is nullable. Nullable<DateTime> or DateTime? (same thing)

Even int are nullable, you know? int? :-)

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check the dateTime default parameter , its value would be 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM,

private void M(Int32 x = 9, String s = “A”, DateTimedt = default(DateTime), Guidguid = new Guid()) {
Console.WriteLine(“x={0}, s={1}, dt={2}, guid={3}”, x, s, dt, guid);
}
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If you use the Nullable the callers of your function can just pass a regular DateTime to it, so they won't notice a thing :) There are implicit operators that will do this for you

If you want to set a default in your function you can do:

public void Foo(DateTime? value = null)
{
    if ( value == null )
    {
        value = ... // default
    } 
}
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    // This is the best way to null out the DateTime.
    //
    DateTime dateTime2 = DateTime.MinValue;
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That doesn't "null out" a DateTime. It's still a valid value. How would you distinguish between deliberately specifying that value, and one which is "absent"? –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '11 at 10:23
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You might consider using the value DateTime.MinValue and use overloading.

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Code Snippet

public DateTime method1()
{

  if (condition)

    return new DateTime(2007, 5, 30, 11, 32, 00);

  else

    return default(DateTime);

}

The default statement will initialise a value type to it's default value. In the case of a datetime this value is also exposed as a static property called DateTime.MinValue. If using C# 1.0 the statement "default(DateTime)" would be equivalent to "DateTime.MinValue". You could use this special value as a kind of "marker" value, meaning if it is returned it indicates an invalid datetime.

If using C# 2.0 again, it is also possible to use what is called a nullable type, and actually return NULL, as shown in the following example

Code Snippet

public DateTime? method2()
{

  if (condition)

    return new DateTime(2007, 5, 30, 11, 32, 00);

  else

    return null;

}
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Depends on your use-case.

Any that won't match real data will work, but that depends on your use of it (so in a way does -1 for integers, since it's a perfectly good integer only for your use of it being one were only positive integers make sense).

If you are sending a minimum date (interested in all foo that are later) then any date prior to the earliest sensible date will do, and code like .Where(f -> f.When > myDate) will work without even having to look for that special case.

Likewise with maximum dates in reverse (any date that would be after the latest sensible date).

Otherwise, just avoid the use of defaults entirely, and overload instead.

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by "overload instead" do you mean repeat the method body in both methods? –  Louis Rhys Oct 20 '11 at 11:57
    
Ideally as much possible would be shared either by one calling the other, or by both calling a private method with the bulk of the code. Just where the balance lies there depends on what you are doing in said methods. –  Jon Hanna Oct 20 '11 at 12:01
    
Yes, I agree, but if one calls the other or both call the same method, we still have to solve the original problem, don't we? –  Louis Rhys Oct 20 '11 at 12:05
    
Only if that's the case, though even then it gets around the fact that the default in a signature has to be compile-time constant. There are also cases where one could call the other, and we don't have to solve it, such as IQueryable<Doc> GetDocs(int catID, DateTime published){return GetDocuments(catID).Where(d => d.Published == published);} which doesn't need to worry about it at all. There's also DateTime? which you dismiss above, but neglect that a method with a DateTime? parameter can be called with a DateTime argument, hence being just as convenient. –  Jon Hanna Oct 20 '11 at 13:14
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