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I am doing the following in actionscript in Coldfusion Flash Forms:

90 / 3.7

Gives me:

24.3243243243243

Whereas the calculator gives me:

24.32432432432432

Note the extra 2 at the end.

So my problem occurs when I am trying to get the original value of 90 by taking the 24.3243243243243 * 3.7 and then I get 89.9999999999 which is wrong.

Why is Actionscript truncating the value and how do I avoid this so I get the proper amount that the calculator gets?

Thanks so much.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Round your number using a routine like this

var toFixed:Function = function(number, factor) {
    return (Math.round(number * factor)/factor);
}

Where the factor is 10, 100, 1000 etc, a simple way to think about it is the number of 0's in the factor is the number of decimal places

so

toFixed(1.23341230123, 100) = 1.23

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But I don't want to round at all. In the code i do a simple division with no rounding. The data type must be rounding itself. –  Cheeky Oct 20 '11 at 13:23
    
Also, rounding results in a result like 89.99 instead of 90 using the rounding approach. I did try this previously. Thanks –  Cheeky Oct 20 '11 at 13:32
    
Thats just how computers deal in floating point precision, there is nothing you can do about it and yes the variable type has an inherit precision. –  Dale Fraser Oct 21 '11 at 0:50
    
Thanks, so you've validated my original post which is that there is a problem. Got any ideas as to a solution? –  Cheeky Oct 21 '11 at 7:44
    
Well you said your trying to get to the original value of 90 which rounding would achieve for you. –  Dale Fraser Oct 21 '11 at 21:49

Good explanation of numeric in ActionScript can be found at http://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/web2/action/ch04_03.htm. See section 4.3.2.1. Floating-point precision

A relavant quote:

"In order to accommodate for the minute discrepancy, you should round your numbers manually if the difference will adversely affect the behavior of your code. "

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Like I said to Dale above, I don't want to round at all. In the code i do a simple division without rounding. The data type must be rounding itself. –  Cheeky Oct 20 '11 at 13:23

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