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I've written a simple Java program, which opens a transaction, selects some records, does some logic and then updates them. I want the records to be locked so I used SELECT...FOR UPDATE.

The program works perfectly fine with MS SQL Server 2005, but in Oracle 10g the records are not locked!

Any idea why?

I create the connection as follow:

Connection connection = DriverManager.getConnection(URL, User, Password);
connection.setAutoCommit(false);

If I execute the SELECT..FOR UPDATE from Oracle SQL Developer client I can see that the records are locked, so I'm thinking it might be an issue with the JDBC driver rather than a database problem, but I couldn't find anything useful online.

These are the details of the JDBC driver I'm using:

Manifest-Version: 1.0
Implementation-Vendor:  Oracle Corporation
Implementation-Title:   ojdbc14.jar
Implementation-Version: Oracle JDBC Driver version - "10.2.0.2.0"
Implementation-Time:    Tue Jan 24 08:55:21 2006
Specification-Vendor:   Oracle Corporation
Sealed: true
Created-By: 1.4.2_08 (Sun Microsystems Inc.)
Specification-Title:    Oracle JDBC driver classes for use with JDK14
Specification-Version:  Oracle JDBC Driver version - "10.2.0.2.0"
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2  
Please be more specific about the problem you experience: what doesn't work? – Mark Rotteveel Oct 20 '11 at 10:56
    
The SELECT...FOR UPDATE does not lock the records. If I try to update the same records at the same time from another program the update succeed, while my understanding is that those records should be locked until I commit or rollback the transaction (this is actually what happens with SQL Server). – Gep Oct 20 '11 at 11:15

Sorry, I cannot reproduce this behaviour. Exactly how are you running your SELECT ... FOR UPDATE queries in JDBC?

I have a table, locktest with the following data in it:

SQL> select * from locktest;

         A          B
---------- ----------
         1          0
         2          0
         3          0
         4          0
         5          0

I also have this Java class:

import oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver;
import java.sql.*;

public class LockTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        DriverManager.registerDriver(new OracleDriver());
        Connection c  = DriverManager.getConnection(
            "jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:XE", "user", "password");

        c.setAutoCommit(false);
        Statement stmt = c.createStatement(
            ResultSet.TYPE_SCROLL_SENSITIVE, ResultSet.CONCUR_UPDATABLE);

        ResultSet rSet = stmt.executeQuery(
            "SELECT a, b FROM locktest FOR UPDATE");

        while (rSet.next()) {
            if (rSet.getInt(1) <= 3) {
                rSet.updateInt(2, 1);
            }
        }

        System.out.println("Sleeping...");
        Thread.sleep(Long.MAX_VALUE);
    }
}

When I run this Java class, it makes some updates to the table and then starts sleeping. It sleeps so that it keeps the transaction open and hence retains the locks.

C:\Users\Luke\stuff>java LockTest
Sleeping...

While this is sleeping, I try to concurrently update the table in SQL*Plus:

SQL> update locktest set b = 1 where a <= 3;

At this point, SQL*Plus hangs until I kill the Java program.

share|improve this answer
1  
I also needed to put rSet.updateRow(); after the updateInt to get the udpate to work. – Codemwnci Jan 17 '12 at 11:43
    
I modified the above code to select a TYPE_FORWARD_ONLY, CONCUR_READ_ONLY result set, and the query still locked other clients from performing a SELECT ... FOR UPDATE on the same row. – Andrew Swan Oct 3 '13 at 7:26

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