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I have a json object

eg

{
 "href":"Test",
 "commentID":"12334556778"
} 

Is there a way just to get the second line i.e. "commentID":"12334556778" I'm using

JSON.stringify(json)

Thanks all

share|improve this question
2  
Your question is a bit confusing. JSON.stringify is for serializing JavaScript objects into JSON. The "JSON object" you posted, is it the result of this operation? Otherwise I cannot see how these two are related. It is unclear whether you are receiving JSON or creating JSON. But in any case, you probably have to work with JavaScript objects, so JSON does not seem to be relevant here. – Felix Kling Oct 20 '11 at 11:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

JSON.stringify accepts a third argument which handles white-space in the output. If the third argument is present and "truthy", line-breaks will be inserted and each level will be indented using the argument's string value, or a number of spaces if a number is passed. Using this technique, you can get the browser to insert line-breaks and then split on those line-breaks in the result:

var obj = {
        "href":"Test",
        "commentID":"12334556778"
    },
    arr = JSON.stringify(obj, null, 1).split("\n");

alert(arr[2]);
//-> ' "commentID": "12334556778"'

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/AndyE/ercRS/ (requires browsers with JSON/trim)

You might want to trim any leading white space or trailing comma, but I'll leave that up to you.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks Andy this is it – Wesley Skeen Oct 20 '11 at 11:23

You can create another object containing only the commentID property:

var obj = {
    "href": "Test",
    "commentID": "12334556778"
};

var result = JSON.stringify({
    "commentID": obj.commentID
});
share|improve this answer

if you have a JSON object at hand, just use it like you would use an array.

var jsonObject = {
   "href":"Test",
   "commentID":"12334556778"
}
alert(jsonObject['commentID']); // alerts 123445678

JSON.stringify() is used if you want to send the data back to your server.

share|improve this answer
2  
That's not a JSON object. It's a JavaScript object. – Felix Kling Oct 20 '11 at 11:05
1  
Since JSON is short for JavaScript Object Notation I doubt that. – FloydThreepwood Oct 20 '11 at 11:07
2  
Java is also in JavaScript but they are not related in any way. JSON is a data format with a syntax similar to JavaScript object literals. A JavaScript object is a data type in JavaScript. You cannot mix that terminology. – Felix Kling Oct 20 '11 at 11:09
1  
@Felix is correct. JSON is a data transfer format. There's no such thing as a "JSON object", JSON can only be a string. – Andy E Oct 20 '11 at 11:10
2  
Maybe, but it does not make you right ;) Another example: If you say that jsonObject contains JSON, then I should be able to parse it with JSON.parse right? But that's not possible. Another analogy might be this: var csv = "a", "b", "c" is valid JavaScript but no one would say that it is CSV (although it looks similar). My point: Only because it looks the same does not make it the same. – Felix Kling Oct 20 '11 at 11:18

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