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I've been trying to figure this out for hours with no success. I'm trying to re-write this Java code into Ruby and I thought I was done, however, something strange is happening.

Java method:

static void analyze (int n, int seriesLen)
{
    int digit[] = new int [9];
    int d = 0;
    int m = n;

    series[seriesLen - 1] = n;

    while (m >= 10) {
        digit[d++] = m % 10;
        m /= 10;
    }
    digit[d++] = m;
    for (int subset = (1 << d) - 2; subset > 0; subset--) {
        int j = 0;
        int s = subset;
        int pos = d - 1;
        /* find first digit */
        while ((s & 1) == 0) {
            s >>= 1;
            pos--;
        }

        /* if first digit is a 0, move on */

        if (digit[pos] == 0) continue;

        do {
            if ((s & 1) == 1) j = j*10 + digit[pos];
            s >>= 1;
            pos--;
            } while (s > 0);


        if (j > 1 && n % j == 0) {
            int k = 0;
            s = subset ^ ((1 << d) - 1);
            pos = d - 1;

            while (s > 0) {
                if ((s & 1) == 1) k = k*10 + digit[pos];
                s >>= 1;
                pos--;
            }

            analyze (k, seriesLen + 1);
        }
    }

    System.out.println("seriesLen: " + seriesLen);
    if (betterSeries (seriesLen)) {
        for (int i = 0; i < seriesLen; i++) {
            best[i] = series[i];
        }
        bestLen = seriesLen;
    }

}

Ruby method:

def analyze(n, seriesLen)
    @digit = [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]
    m = n
    d = 0
    $series[seriesLen-1] = n

    while(m >= 10)
        @digit[d] = (m % 10)
        d = d + 1
        m /= 10
    end
    @digit[d] = m
    d = d + 1
    subset = (1 << d) - 2
    while (subset > 0)
        j = 0
        s = subset
        pos = d - 1
        while ((s & 1) == 0)
            s >>= 1
            pos -= 1
        end
        if (@digit[pos] == 0):
            subset -= 1
            next
        end
        begin
            j = (j*10 + @digit[pos]) if ((s & 1) == 1)
            s >>= 1
            pos -= 1
        end while s > 0
        if (j > 1 && n % j == 0):
            k = 0
            s = (subset) ^ ((1 << d) - 1)
            pos = d - 1
            while (s > 0)
                k = (k*10 + @digit[pos]) if ((s & 1) == 1)
                s >>= 1
                pos -= 1
            end

            analyze(k, seriesLen + 1)
        end

        subset -= 1
    end

    if (betterSeries(seriesLen)):
        for i in 0...seriesLen
            $best[i] = $series[i]
        end
        $bestLen = seriesLen;
    end
end

I did some traces on the relevant data for both versions of the code. Everything is exactly the same until about halfway through. After this point, the digit[] array in the Java version has all zeros except for a 2 at digit[2] (which is correct). However, at this point in the Ruby version, digit[2] is zero along with all the other elements. I am very confused about why they seem to work in perfect harmony for so long until this discontinuity appears. I can't even figure out why digit[2] = 2 in the Java version (and I am positive the Java code is correct).

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What's with the : at the end of your if's? –  cHao Oct 20 '11 at 11:42
1  
"Everything is exactly the same until about halfway through" -> halfway through what? –  JRL Oct 20 '11 at 11:45
    
cHao, : at the end of if-expression come from 1.8 syntax –  WarHog Oct 20 '11 at 11:50
    
@cHao Sorry, this is my first attempt at ever writing anything in Ruby. One of the books I was looking at used colons at the end of if statements. –  user977680 Oct 20 '11 at 11:51
    
@JRL By halfway through, I mean halfway through the program's execution. If I print out the digit array at every iteration of the for(...subset...)/while(...subset...) loop, the different versions of code will produce the same arrays until about halfway through. Then for some reason the Java array has a 2 in it whereas the Ruby array does not. This screws everything up. I'm supposed to have digit[2] = 2 when subset = 5, but for some reason I do not in the Ruby code. I haven't slept in quite some time, so I apologize if I can not make an intelligent point right now. –  user977680 Oct 20 '11 at 11:56
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your @digit is an instance variable, not a local. (That's what the @ means.) It will get reset to all zeros every time you call analyze. And since analyze calls itself halfway through, it ends up overwriting the previous call's version with an array of all zeros before it starts doing its thing. (In the Java code, on the other hand, it's a local -- and each call has its own digit.)

Try getting rid of the @ in the variable name, and see if that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
That did it! All that time wasted because I couldn't get the right variable scopes... Thanks! –  user977680 Oct 20 '11 at 12:14
    
@user977680: Not a problem. If this helped, feel free to click that check mark next to the answer :) –  cHao Oct 20 '11 at 12:21
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