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I have a class called MyClass:

public class MyClass extends abstractClass implements
        someInterface {

    Set<VNode> relation_;
    Set<VNode> x_;
    Set<VNode> y_;


     @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {

        if (!super.equals(obj)) {
            return false;
        }

        if (this == obj) {
            return true;
        }
        if (obj == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if (!(obj instanceof MyClass)) {
            return false;
        }
        MyClass other = (MyClass) obj;

        if (relation_ == null) {
            if (other.relation_ != null) {
                return false;
            }
        } else if (!relation_.equals(other.relation_)) {
            return false;
        }
        if (x_ == null) {
            if (other.x_ != null) {
                return false;
            }
        } else if (!x_.equals(other.x_)) {
            return false;
        }
        if (y_ == null) {
            if (other.y_ != null) {
                return false;
            }
        } else if (!y_.equals(other.y_)) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        int res = new HashCodeBuilder(17, 37).append(relation_).append(x_)
                .append(y_).append(getWeight()).toHashCode();

        return res;
    }
}

The abstract class is as follows:

public abstract class abstractClass {

    double weight_;


    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj) {
            return true;
        }
        if (obj == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if (!(obj instanceof abstractClass)) {
            return false;
        }
        abstractClass other = (abstractClass) obj;
        if (Double.doubleToLongBits(weight_) != Double
                .doubleToLongBits(other.weight_)) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    public double getWeight() {
        return weight_;
    }


    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        long temp;
        temp = Double.doubleToLongBits(weight_);
        result = prime * result + (int) (temp ^ (temp >>> 32));
        return result;
    }

}

Now, if I have HashSet<MyClass> s1 and an MyClass i1, even if s1 has an element s1i whith s1i.equals(i1)=true and s1i.hashCode()=i1.hashCode(), s1.contains(i1) gives me false.

Any explanations?

Other classes:

public class VNode {

    Mention mention_;


    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object obj) {
        if (this == obj) {
            return true;
        }
        if (obj == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if (!(obj instanceof VNode)) {
            return false;
        }
        VNode other = (VNode) obj;
        if (mention_ == null) {
            if (other.mention_ != null) {
                return false;
            }
        } else if (!mention_.equals(other.mention_)) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }


    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result
                + ((mention_ == null) ? 0 : mention_.hashCode());
        return result;
    }



}




public class Mention extends Range {


    private final int                           id_;


    public Mention(final int start, final int end) {
        super(start, end);

        id_ = getNextMentionID();
    }

}





public class Range {


    private final int start_;

    private final int end_;

    /**
     * Contr.
     * 
     * @param start
     * @param end
     */
    public Range(final int start, final int end) {
        start_ = start;
        end_ = end;
    }



    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object obj) {
        if (this == obj) {
            return true;
        }
        if (obj == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if (!(obj instanceof Range)) {
            return false;
        }
        Range other = (Range) obj;
        if (end_ != other.end_) {
            return false;
        }
        if (start_ != other.start_) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }



    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + end_;
        result = prime * result + start_;
        return result;
    }



}
share|improve this question
1  
Please post the hashCode() method of the VNode class. – Stephan Oct 20 '11 at 11:44
    
So two mentions are equal if the range is equal? The id does not matter? – Stephan Oct 20 '11 at 11:58
    
Yes, the ID is not taken into consideration for equality. – myahya Oct 20 '11 at 12:03
    
Ah ok. I think the hashcode of sets depends on their element order, which is not defined for a hashset. Does it work when you use TreeSets instead? – Stephan Oct 20 '11 at 12:08
    
But I do check the hashCodes, which are equal. Also, equal objects have equal hashCodes – myahya Oct 20 '11 at 12:30

Your equals() method is not readable at all. Since you are using HashCodeBuilder in hashCode(), why not use EqualsBuilder as well?

Version a)

public boolean equals(Object obj){
    if(obj == null || obj.getClass()!=getClass()){
        return false;
    }
    MyClass other = (MyClass) obj;
    return new EqualsBuilder()
      // check parent properties first
      .append(this.getWeight(), other.getWeight())
      .append(this.relation_, other.relation_)
      .append(this.x_, other.x_)
      .append(this.y_, other.y_)
      .isEquals();
}

Version b)

public boolean equals(Object obj){
    // delegate to parent equals first
    if(!super.equals(obj)){
        return false;
    }
    MyClass other = (MyClass) obj;
    return new EqualsBuilder()
      .append(this.relation_, other.relation_)
      .append(this.x_, other.x_)
      .append(this.y_, other.y_)
      .isEquals();
}
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot the super call to equals. And getClass() calls introduce problems as well - at least it introduces unnecessary limitations for some cases. – Voo Oct 20 '11 at 13:29
    
@Voo no, using getClass() instead of instanceof is a feature, not a bug. It makes sure I am dealing with the same type, not a subtype. Otherwise you have an asymmetric equals(). – Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 20 '11 at 13:44
    
But I added getWeight() to the equals check, so that the relevant properties of the parent class are also checked. In fact I added a second version to do it in two different flavors – Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 20 '11 at 13:46
    
You can implement a correct version while still using instanceof, it just needs a helper method - I didn't say it's a bug, I said it introduces unnecessary limits, which is true (I can't extend your class and still expect it to work even if I don't introduce new attributes, say because I just want to log something). But the real problem is not calling super.equals() imo - that makes it basically impossible to guarantee a correct implementation if the base class implementation should ever change. – Voo Oct 20 '11 at 16:00

Each class should only be concerned with its own variables when calculating equals and hashcode. So, in your MyClass instead of calling getWeight() you should be using the hashcode of the super class. Like you are with equals()!. In this case the effect will be the same.

public int hashCode() {
    int res = new HashCodeBuilder(super.hashcode(), 37).append(relation_).append(x_)
            .append(y_);

    return res;
}

This means any changes to the base class that may affect equals and hashcode are confined to the class and you don't have to update the sub classes.

(Not really an answer, more an observation but its too big for a comment)

share|improve this answer
    
If apache commons-lang are used ObjectUtils.hashCodeMulti(Object..) is faster and does not create new objects on each hashCode() call. – Stephan Oct 20 '11 at 11:57

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